Large sharpie for the Adriatic

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Igor, Jul 1, 2022.

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  1. tane
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    tane Senior Member

  2. tane
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    tane Senior Member

  3. tane
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    tane Senior Member

    @strip planking: narrow hulls are certainly much easier to strip-plank than fat ones with lots of curvature. All strips can follow the sheerline & run out on the keel.
    Building over permanent ply frames sound strange (& dangerously weak) to me: the inner glass/epoxi-lamination(s) stop at all frames which then form a hard spot in a weak place of the hull skin
     
  4. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

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  5. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

    Which of the wharrams have you got? I have noticed the poor setup but he still got the boat up to 15 knots.
     
  6. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

    I thought the same, i would build 150-200mm tabs beneath the bulkheads in order to not build stress point loading.
     
  7. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

  8. Igor
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    Igor Junior Member

    Stevenson's boats receive lot of bad rep on the internet, almost as much as McGregor 26, altough the latter has it merits. I see plenty of those here in Croatia, its weird to see a sailboat doing 15+ knots under outboard power. For some people it may be an ideal boat.
     
  9. Rumars
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    Rumars Senior Member

    While this is not an ideal method, it's not dangerous in any way. Framed strip boats have been built without any interior (or exterior) sheating. With continuous interior sheating he would not need that many frames, just a few bulkheads, like a foam core boat. He traded some additional weight for an easier build, that's all. With a full complement of frames the interior glass is just additional strength.
     
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  10. tane
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    tane Senior Member

    our Wharram was a Mk1 Tangaroa.
    Stripplank: sure there were strip planked boats without any sheathing, inside or out (Guzzwells Trekka, if I remember right), but the concept of "modern" stripplank/glass/epoxi composite" is different: here the strips are "just" the core of a sandwich, mainly bearing shear loads between the skins (& only to some degree longitudinal loads). The wood, WRC, is light, the sheathing, particularly on larger boats, substantial (not just an abrasion protection on the outside). Laminate weight should be equal inside & out (as far as I found in the literature). I don't see the advantage of building over permanent frames: take them out after turn-over, grind 2 or 3mm off around their perimeter & put them back in after the interior laminate is in place.
    Stevensons boat were all new to me when I found them yesterday evening, I didn't want to offend somebodys aesthetics (I just thought from the pics that they are along similar lines & looks as the here-so-favoured sharpies ;))
     
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  11. tane
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    tane Senior Member

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  12. tane
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    tane Senior Member

  13. Rumars
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    Rumars Senior Member

    Building over permanent frames is faster, there is no need for removing thousands of temporary fasteners. The only way I know to achieve the same speed on temporary forms is by using plastic nails, with them you can break the forms from the skin with a mallet.
    The structural solutions are a matter of choice, there is more then one way to skin a cat.
    Sheating is another example, very few people do infusion over strip, altough it's absolutely feasible and a better and cleaner job then hand lamination.
     
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  14. rnlock
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    rnlock Senior Member

    The Stevenson listings I've looked at are plain old flat iron skiffs with decorations that are supposed to make them look like older designs. Some of these decorations are below the waterline and would cause lots of extra drag. I'm sure they would sail better without the disguises, although then they're just relatively fat skiffs.

    To my eye, the Sharpie 600 looks a bit on the fat side, although maybe the bottom is narrower than I think it is. Also, I don't see any dimensions or weights. It may be that I'm just blind. It may be that the Sharpie 600 is light enough to sail well.

    The Brewer Mystic has a fairly low d/l ratio and is relatively narrow as well. I expect it's moderately fast if it can stand up to its sail plan.

    The Hampton Flattie is supposed to be based closely on a "hulk" measured by Howard Chapelle, so I don't think it's fair to call it a caricature.

    The Arcachon 26, to my eyes, looks traditional from the waterline to the deck. However, I think that style of topsides usually goes with a deep, traditional keel, if I'm not mistaken, plus the high aspect Marconi rig seems out of character. The stern gives away a lot of waterline length. So maybe it deserves to be called a caricature.

    I've seen a MacGregor, but never one under high power. In a video I saw on the net, it looks kind of ridiculous, but if you really have to get back to work...

    I think almost all of the monohulls mentioned here would be likely to heel significantly.

    So many designs have been mentioned in this thread that I can't really remember them all.
     
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  15. Milehog
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    The Stevenson boats are not built by knowledgeable boaters, their audience is newbies that only see boat shaped objects. I'm not just regurgitating stuff I heard somewhere; I have experience with one.
    For the same expenditure of materials and time you can build a competent boat that does everything better.
     
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