Laminate Schedule

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by SOB, Sep 29, 2004.

  1. SOB
    Joined: Sep 2004
    Posts: 13
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Georgia

    SOB Junior Member

    Need decent laminate schedule for 40' performance boat. Want to use foam core in the bottom, possibly corecell and the sides. HElp needed to keep weight down and maintain strength. Non vacuum bagged.
     
  2. Eric Sponberg
    Joined: Dec 2001
    Posts: 2,005
    Likes: 210, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2917
    Location: On board Corroboree

    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    The laminate for the hull depends on the the arrangement of the structure inside. The frames and bulkheads work in concert with the internal structure, and you cannot design one without the other. A laminate for a boat with little internal structure will not be appropriate for a boat with lots of internal structure. In general, a boat with more frames makes for a thinner hull laminate and vice versa. Since the hull laminate makes up the lion's share of the weight (about 2/3rds or more) a boat with more internal framing is almost always lighter than a boat with little internal framing.

    You should consult with a naval architect experienced in laminate design who can engineer the laminate you need, taking into account how the boat is built and with what framing and structure is inside.

    Eric
     
  3. lucas adriaanse
    Joined: Sep 2004
    Posts: 50
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 21
    Location: netherlands

    lucas adriaanse amazing-sailing.com

    SOB (I take it that means Sort of a Boatbuilder)

    To amplify Eric, laminate schedules also depend on core thickness & density. A 20mm core makes for a stiffer panel than a 10mm core, obviously. And the type of core also makes a difference. CoreCell is very good for impact resistance, but makes for a less stiff panel than Divinycell (which is less impact resistant ...); to mention just 2 brands.
    Then, you have the multitude of possibilities with laminate materials (e-glass, s-glass, Kevlar, Twaron, carbon etc) and the way these are woven or layed etc.

    In other words: consult a naval engineer or architect if you really want to start such an exciting project that's not without risks. As Eric advises.

    Good luck
    Lucas
     
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