Kurt Hughes updated Trikala 19 trimaran

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Corley, Jan 28, 2013.

  1. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    Kurt Hughes has released a render of his updated Trikala 19 trimaran that is apparently going to go into series production in Asia.

    http://multihulldesigns.com/designs_stock/daysail/19_tri.htm

    It uses the "monoslip connectives" illustrated on the Trikala 19 page it looks like a good and simple system for a small trimaran. The waterstays come tight as the beam slides out for sailing but you can move the boat around by motor with the floats retracted. The benefits seem to be that you can get the boat narrow for a marina berth without getting growth on or having to antifoul the top of the floats as on a f-boat or occupy extra berth length like a dragonfly. There would be a restriction on overall beam though I imagine due to the length of beam coming through the boat and out the other side when folded. The diagrams I've seen show just the end of the beam in the tube near the gunnel when deployed at full width.
     

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  2. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    So looks something like the L7 beams then

    Richard Woods
     
  3. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    This was always an interesting small trimaran. Been around for some time.
    I believe it was in production in Europe for a short time.
    Too bad the bows got put on upside down this time.

    But, whatever someone will buy.....
     
  4. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    I think the L7 used pultruded fibreglass beams without waterstays? Maybe someone more familiar with it can clarify. Similar kind of idea in operation though I'm sure Kurt's implementation was earlier than the L7.
     
  5. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I came across an auction (Georgia, US) on craigslist for a Spanish built production version - with standard bows.
    Sorry I did not get a link. It was on Yakz for about $7K and looks quite nice.
     
  6. jamez
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    jamez Senior Member

    L7 was designed with sliding pultruded glass I beams and no water stays. Quite a clever idea but the forward beam boxes used up a bit of cabin space. IMO the L7 was a nice simple boat - although it was never promoted much once the first couple were launched. http://home.comcast.net/~ritakend/site/
     
  7. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    Is the L7 still in production? I cant find anything on the Multimarine website that suggests it is. I recall reading Brent's build blog of his L7 trimaran ages ago it was a relatively easy way of building a small trimaran with some accomodation thats for sure.
     
  8. jamez
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    jamez Senior Member

    It was never a production boat as such, although I think Mike built two - the prototype with modified cat hulls for floats and more of a flared centre hull, and the first 'proper' L7. You bought the glass pans off Mike and a set of plans, timber and ply and went to work. He had beams etc. for sale on his website for a while. But nothing new about the boat for years. I looked at importing the bits to NZ but the cost of freight and and (at the time) less friendly exchange rate made it a non starter. Looked at stripping the pans, but then it seemed just as easy to strip the whole thing, which would have meant a re-design etc etc. gave up on that one. I think its a great little sports tri that could have been developed further.
     
  9. Corley
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    Here are Kurt's notes on the updated design and the differences to the original. Interesting to see more trimarans under construction in asia the TC627 is the most recent I know of. I'll be curious to see who is taking on the construction of this boat and whether they bought the original molds and decided to give it a bit of a facelift? Good to see more options in the small trimaran market.

    http://multihullblog.com/2013/02/trikala-19-trimaran-update/

    "The Trikala 19 trimaran has been updated. The original design had a main hull and deck as 2 pieces. The update is a single piece, (well 2 halves) and looks more rounded. It also has X bows to increase speed in waves. It will be built in Asia. It can be made ready to trailer in a few minutes. It can stay on the water in the “in position” indefinitely. I’m sure it will cost less than the same size folder."
     
  10. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    I like the 19-very good looking.....
     
  11. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

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  12. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    The overall length looks longer than the original. Is it still a 19'?
    Besides looks what is the benefit of the inverted bows? Really I'm looking for a benefit not the advertising.
     
  13. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    --------------
    You don't like the looks of reverse bows? It seems like they must work pretty well from a design and real world standpoint in the A Class. I think they look great.....
     
  14. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Doug, thats a typical feel good statement.:rolleyes:
    What I would like it to hear some actual facts rather than gushing about the latest fad.

    I did not say anything about the "looks" because that is immaterial to me. People can get use to anything that works better.

    If the bows are actually extended on the waterline, that will provide more righting moment for preventing nose diving.
    If the bows are actually no different in providing the pitching resistance then they should not help until you would submerge the "normal" deck and get an increased force stopping the boat.

    So what is actually designed into such a boat?
    All I want to know is what is intended by the designer and how does it compare to an older typical boat - a Tornado catamaran just as an example. For instance the Tornado has the mast placed mid length.
    The illustration of the Trikala seems to show the mast much farther back, which by itself will provide more pitchpole resistance, no matter if you have a Tornado or a reversed bow.

    Just a few facts.

    Oracle 17 showed that reversed bows by themselves don't prevent a pitchpole, although I believe the reduced width deck gave them much gentler and slower crash, giving them more chance to recover. I will be the first to agree that not all things were equal for Oracle so that is not a good comparison.
     

  15. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The inverted bows make you really wet, which in hot weather is great.
     
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