Kurt Hughes Daycharter 36

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Charly, Mar 10, 2010.

  1. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    Last two weeks I have been working on the stitch up.I was really surprised at the amont of effort it takes. Man! my hands will never be the same...on the second hull, I will definitely having a "keel lacing party". It is repetitive monotonous work.

    I am almost done now and will be ready to rotate the hull 180 and spread it for the keel pour.
     

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  2. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    Any hints on how to flip it over? I am thinking that I should add some thwart supports about the same beam width as the finished hull will be, attaching them somehow to the sheer stringer, and gently roll the whole thing over.

    Also, I am building some overhead scaffolding now, out of truss joists and 2x6's so that I can hang a walk board down over the keel so I can work in there on the keel pour without walking on it. I only have about eight feet of headroom, and about a 14 ft span in the garage. That gives me a good sturdy wall to hang off of, though. I am thinking these overhead thwart support beams will bear the weight of the hull, so maybe I can take a turn around them with some ropes, etc, to better control the thing, so it wont go crashing on the concete floor.:eek: This could get interesting...
     
  3. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    I helped a friend flip the ama's of his 40 buccaneer and he used the method you describe of ropes from an overhead. Supported the hulls from the ropes and then removed the supports to the floor so they were hanging. With a little persuasion they rotated very nicely in their rope cradle. He had called for the "refreshing beverage" gang for the muscle to flip it, but it was way overkill cause a couple of guys could have done it. Better more than enough than not enough.

    And of course we enjoyed the refreshing beverages.

    Steve
     
  4. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I'm thinking that idea of thwart supports is exactly right, Charly. You can get some foam and cushion the landing of the hull when you roll it.

    One thought: Is it possible to use a drill to do a lot of the grunt work of lacing up the keel joint? I know back in the lab we used to use drills to make twisted pair cabling out of standard copper wire. Worked pretty well. Maybe you could use the drill to twist them most of the way then hand twist the end?

    I have been thinking about how to suspend over the keel laying job as well. That's a tough one, I think. There doesn't seem to be much more than the long plank scaffolding method. Not looking forward to that at all...

    Hulls go up Friday AM on my build.
     
  5. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Charly Senior Member

    A couple of guys and Archimedes can accomplish a whole lot.

    Good idea bout the drill. I kept thinking the whole time about the way I used to tie re-bar, with the looped ends on the tie wires and the little wooden handled tool with the rotating hook. That obviously wouldn't work, but maybe a clamp, a small vise grip or something chucked into a drill....hmmm....

    CB- are you doing your first lamination?..... pics?....I figured youve been typing less and working more...
     
  6. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    "little wooden handled tool with the rotating hook"....and why wouldn't that work with copper wire?
     
  7. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member


    Yep... first half hull lamination goes up Friday AM. I'm preparing for it, getting everything set. Doing the 8x8 hull panels for a 45' cat ate up a little more time than I had expected. Plus, I had lots of workshop issues, like not having a drum pump (or barrel pump) that works with hardener. I got some nice Dayton stainless pumps from Grainger. They work great for the resin, but the hardener comes out in a foam in tiny spatterings. Can't seem to find a pump that works right with hardener. :confused:

    Also, I had those scarf joint issues from improper tools. Right now, though... I have stack of 8x8's that is enough to do the 4 laminations. Just stocking up on Liquid Nails (bag sealant), double checking the mold's alignment and rounding up people to work.

    When you're not in a position to pay much, it's hard to get people to show up! :D
     
  8. uncookedlentil
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Olympic peninsula Washington

    uncookedlentil Junior Member

    use an aluminum ladder after a quick strength test, and hang it down the keel line using the deck flange for support.

    I laced up hulls, right side up in cradles, using angle gages below, deck flange topsides. rolling time saw keelson already installed along with all additional bulkheads and stringers.

    big wheels cut and fitted around the hull, and well braced off the deck flange made roll over a snap.
     
  9. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Great input!

    Am I reading your post correctly, that you laced up the hulls from below? Was that difficult to be working from the floor?
     
  10. uncookedlentil
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Olympic peninsula Washington

    uncookedlentil Junior Member

    no, but the tallest hulls i've constructed were only 6' by 52' long. cradles were 14'' maybe 16'' high amidships, just enough to work comfortably on an automotive creeper with vice grips to tighten.
     
  11. Charly
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    Charly Senior Member

    It could, but the extra effort might not be worth it. The steel wires that are used to tie re-bar that way come in pre-cut rolls with wires that have loops in both ends. You wrap it around the steel then insert the tool into both eyes and wrangle the thing up till it is tight. To do it on stitch and glue with copper, you would have to thread the wires in first, then form the loop on the end of the copper wire (another step in the process).

    I will definately experiment with it next time.
     
  12. uncookedlentil
    Joined: May 2008
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    uncookedlentil Junior Member

    you can still use the wood handle thingy without expensive pre ties, simply cut your wire a little longer, push thr the holes and pull wires down and around the hook and THEN up and around around the hangy down part of the wire.

    Hope the description was semi intelligible.:)
     
  13. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    I know. I used to sell the wires and the little wooden handled thingy. Now I am feeling nostalgic for Lindsley Lumber Co. 1972.
     
  14. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    And as we used to do in the lab, just hand-tighten the drill chock around the wires and press the button. Instant twist! :)
     

  15. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    Well dang. I haven't been asking enough questions:D
     
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