Kurt Hughes Daycharter 36

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Charly, Mar 10, 2010.

  1. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: South Florida USA

    keysdisease Senior Member

    Ahh the Pirate house, I know it well. Did a great rebuild after the fire, I actually knew Harvey and have friends that live on that street. I'm a member of the upper keys sailing club and lived in Key Wierd from 77 to 87 and on Plantation Key from 87 til 92. Now live in Ft Lauderdale but Keysbound at every opportunity.

    In the olde days closed them all cept the Crib and the OV.

    I work in the Marine Industry and helped many a Key West Boatbuilder figure out how to make an CG inspected vessel.

    If you want the option to carry 6+ passengers, especially on a wooden boat, I would get in touch with the Coasties ASAP. I am familiar with Hugh's Cats and have ran a day charter cat myself. Regardless of how many USCG inspected Hugh's Cats there are out there the key word is "inspected."

    Steve

     
  2. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    Hi Keysdisease,

    We probably crossed the same path many times..

    I did call my local coastie back when I was getting started. He told me that I could get certified after the build, so I figure, stick to the plans, (maybe overbuild the stringers a little bit) keep all documents and samples for later tests, say a little prayer, and keep going.

    :)
     
  3. uncookedlentil
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    Location: Olympic peninsula Washington

    uncookedlentil Junior Member

     
  4. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    Hello uncookedlentil,

    Actually they haven't relaxed at all which was the point of my post re inspection.

    There is a reason they are called "inspected" vessels.

    Steve
     
  5. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Does anyone have input for Charly on fixing this? I can say I don't, because I would be asking the designer what to do. I wouldn't have a clue...
     
  6. keysdisease
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    Hey Catbuilder,

    Any designer of a vessel intended to take 6+ pax out on US waters would tell their client to get in touch with their local USCG inspection office.

    If you are planning on building the same vessel with intentions of carrying passengers (6+) I would tell you the same thing. The Coasties that do inspections are pretty autonomous and can make you jump through some hoops if you are unprepared.

    They are particularly sticky about wooden boats. They do have regional "flavors" but usually (initially) approve inspections from other districts. For instance I know that Gold Coast consulted with the District that covers Hawaii when they were building boats for use there even though they had inspectors on site in the VI.

    If you intend to charter, CYA

    Steve
     
  7. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Although your button seems to be stuck on inspections, Charly had a panel buckle and I'm wondering if there ate other ways to handle the situation. You can put your roll of red tape away. I won't be needing any, thanks.

     
  8. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

     
  9. Charly
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    Charly Senior Member

    I thought my solution above was pretty good :)

    I welcome any and all advice
     
  10. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Most definitely.... it was good. I was just wondering if people had other techniques as well. Maybe it's kind of an arcane issue that not many run into. Communication doesn't always come across properly on a forum.

    I was thinking maybe there would be a lot of suggestions to mull through and weigh them out.
     
  11. Charly
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    Charly Senior Member

    Hey keysdisease,

    This has been a nagging issue from day one, for me. I am 57 years old, and mainly just want to go sailing. The charter aspect of this design was a secondary consideration-- I may still try and get certified. If I do, I will have to have the designer send triplicate sets of the plans to the coasties, and supply them with whatever calcs or other stuff they may ask for. And then do whatever they say do. I am working on a tight budget, basically "pay as you go", and I have to keep working in order to buy the basicis. I am operating in "bare bones" mindset- that is why I chose this design. Simple. All deck. Doable for a backyard builder. The most boat for the money, but no frills whatsoever. And I would like to get out on the water sooner, rather than later.

    The local coast guard inspector in Savannah sounded like a reasonable guy, and the stuff he told me about was all stuff that would have to be done after the boat is built. I asked him specifiaclly, if I could have it all done after the build, and he said "sure" without hesitation or caveat. That satisfied me. Now, I have dealt with enough government agencies to know that different folks will tell you differnet things, as gospel, and they can also make your life a living hell. But I cannot allow the tail to wag the dog on this issue. I want to go sailing. After that, I might want to carry more than six people out for money. I will deal with it then.

    I do appreciate your imputs on this issue, and if you think I am missing something important, please say so. Thanks.

    Charly
     
  12. Charly
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    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    Thanks Catbuilder. The good news is this thing doesn't have to be fixed in the next week or so anyway. I have plenty else to do with sheer stringers, scarfing jigs, planing, bracing, etc

    so how is your project coming?
     
  13. uncookedlentil
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    Location: Olympic peninsula Washington

    uncookedlentil Junior Member

    Now to fix it.

    I would very much appreciate all inputs here. Let me start with my idea, and please feel free to critique or add on.
    I am thinking I should rout out two layers of ply, on the inside of the panel, with the middle layer routed back away from the crack several inches, and the inside layer routed back even more, to create a "stepped" canyon. Then glue in some dutchmen. and then maybe overlap and cover the whole thing with some triax. Fair and fill outside. The outside will eventually be covered with cloth anyway. maybe I should drill a hole at the end of the crack, and fill with bog?


    hey charley,

    routing the damage is ok, but i would use a 4'' angle grinder and create scarph joints in the repair area. a 7to 1 scarph repair could be installed in a couple of sessions and would exactly duplicate your specified layup.

    a scarph should layup to be slightly stronger than the wood that extends either side from it
     
  14. Charly
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    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    roger roger

    great idea

    thanks

    it might be easier just to grind the whole thing, considering the curve.
     

  15. uncookedlentil
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Olympic peninsula Washington

    uncookedlentil Junior Member

    I was thinking the same:cool:

    take your time and possibly repair one veneer inside or out, add a 1x3 keel line temp stiffener, grind staggered and scarphed strips on remaining after carefully rotating panel. wide crown staples could eliminate vacuum hassels
     
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