Kurt Hughes Daycharter 36

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Charly, Mar 10, 2010.

  1. Charly
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    Charly Senior Member

    Sure that would work. If you arent worried about scraping dried liquid nail from the perimiter after you are done. And provided the ply isn't too stiff to conform to the curvature if there is any.

    edit- you might try the aluminum tape around the perimeter it sticks pretty good and would be less messy
     
  2. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Got lots of duct tape, and there bottom has very little curvature. Thanks for the suggestions!
     
  3. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    Chainplates

    Well, the planets finally lined up so I could start with the composite chainplates.

    First, I really misunderguestimated the time and effort that goes into it. Thirty four layers. Without a helper, that is thirty four trips up and down the ladder, and then down the companionway into the hull interior, to squeegee each one. plus prep, bog, peel ply etc. It is nuts. it took all day working alone at a dead run for just one chainplate. Get some help!

    I cut a "mail slot" in the deck, laminated up some 3/8 ply for the core, cut it on a 7 degree angle, bogged it into place next to the slot, faired it with some more bog, wrapped a 1/2 inch rod with several layers of waxed paper, then wrapped it in several more layers of wet 12 oz biax, layed it in place and faired it, then one by one, wet out and laminated on each "butterfly" cutout piece of uni or biax. These pieces are mostly uni, with the warp oriented in the direction of the shroud, but not always, there are some pieces cut with the warp at different angles, and every six pieces or so, a piece of 12 oz biax. The pieces are staggered in length.

    You have to poke the wet cloth down into the slot, then go down and smooth it out, following the contour of the inner hull, over the stringers, and at times, around the bulkhead. It is not a big deal, but it really would be a LOT quicker to have two laminators working together on this job.

    Next week I will remove the temp rod, fill in the rest of the slot, shape and trim it, and cut out the center part where the shroud turnbuckle will attach to the titanium rod.

    edit, I was not able to get many pictures of the lay-up. the one photo of the side of the hull is about 1/3 the way though the job. The end result covers a larger area on the side of the hull

    edit- new photo added today of the plywood core, roughed in for the stbd. hull. The pin will lay in the channel on top.

    edit- another new photo shows cutout with pin reinserted. (much fairing to do yet)
     

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  4. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Charly Senior Member

    odds and ends

    A "sands all" for those tight spaces.

    Bagging seat panels. Scrapped out from 4mm okume leftovers, with 3/4 xps between. These are supported every 16 inches with a vertical bulkhead from the same material. Being paranoid again, I rove and coved the tops and bottoms. I peeled off the plastic film and roughed them up a bit with a paint roller with some drywall screws screwed though the roller with the points just sticking out.

    The nylon screws were driven with a drill and a ground down 1" spade bit to fit the slots
     

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  5. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    tiller

    Scrapped out from leftover balsa sandwich cutoff piece of the bridgedeck.
    It has thin strips of dear precious sitka scrap covering. (I know I know) I just had to have at least a little brightwork ;) I can't help it.

    Should I coat it with neat epoxy first, or just go on ahead and varnish it? It will have a sun cover.
     

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  6. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    - any more of that and you may find yourself exiled to the wooden boat forum!
     
  7. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    That is a handsome tiller.
     
  8. Charly
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    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    Thanks Hoyt! I wanted a little more curvature, but that deck material barely bends at all.

    Ak I wouldn't dare show my face over at wooden boat:eek: Those guys over there are just awesome.
     
  9. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    - true, I'm following a couple of builds there myself! They almost make me feel humble, although I am genetically handicapped in that area.
     
  10. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Charly Senior Member

    Merry Christmas! The orange tree is on its fourth crop since I ordered plans in 09.

    Here I have a very rough approximation of a console. I am trying to get a feel for things, what will go where. etc. I think I want to keep the engine controls inside the box to keep from fouling in the sheets. Not much else will go in there, I guess an isolator switch, fire extinguisher, etc. The strange thing for me is getting used to having a tiller instead of a wheel. I guess I will have to fiddle with it for a while before making anything permanent.

    Suggestions welcomed
     

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  11. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Ive never driven a cat. Must be difficult to dock when the helmsman is in the middle of the boat.

    What is the consoles function ? Is a console needed ?
     
  12. Steve W
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    Location: Duluth, Minnesota

    Steve W Senior Member

    Its a podium, you need somewhere to stand when addressing the charter guests.
     
  13. Charly
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    Charly Senior Member

    I've been calling it the "lectern" :D

    She will be powered with two 9.9's, that will attach to brackets set far apart on the back of the beam. The brackets will swing up and down, the arm pivots at a pad eye mounted underneath the deck. This will enable the motors to swing up and out of the water when not in use. It is controlled by a simple line and block setup that can be made fast on top of the beam near the helm.

    Docking shouldn't be too much of a problem, but windage is a concern. It just kills me to have this console, lectern, binnacle thing sticking up there like a sore thumb, after going to so much trouble to keep the decks sleek. I think I might lower it a few more inches and round it some more. Of course the stanchions and awning will also contribute to the windage problem. You just have to have these things though.

    Below is a sister ship, with no awning, and I cant tell where he has his engine controls.
     

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  14. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I would have preferred two tillers for visibility. Perhaps on a cat visibility is not so much of an issue.
    Will there be some kinda sun awning to protect the helmsman from burning up
     

  15. Charly
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    Charly Senior Member

    I'm sure it will be an issue on this boat, especially with a gang of revelers. With a hiking stick the helmsman can position outboard, though I doubt all the way outboard. The beam is 22.5 feet, so that would be hefty hiking stick!
    I thought it would be cool to build a light seat frame as part of the stanchions up there in the corner, at the aft beam and all the way outboard. That place would probably give the best visibility, but it is a looong stretch to the tiller. I may have to settle for a position closer in. How does everybody else deal with this problem?

    There will definitely be awnings. The only thing certain at this point is a four post affair that covers the seats there in the middle of the deck under the boom. It will be a real challenge to make something beautiful and sleek. I am thinking a slight camber to match the beams with rigid battens to hold the shape (pvc?) somehow this must be able to be extended to cover the helm positions. A boom vang would mess up this plan too.

    I have a lot of stuff to decide and figure out before I ever get to the water. Fortunately for me, at this point I am out of money.:D
     
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