Kevlar Canoe Building using a Female Plug - Help

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by wellerj, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. wellerj
    Joined: Apr 2012
    Posts: 2
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    Location: Alberta

    wellerj New Member

    Hey

    I am working on learning how to build a kevlar canoe, but all of the information I can find on the process uses a Male plug system.

    I have an old fibreglass female plug that that an old timer I know designed and used to build fibreglass canoes with, which I would like to use both for sentimental and practical (its already made and ready to go) purposes.

    Could anyone help me out by pointing me in the direction of some good resources for how this is done. Or just go ahead and explain to me if the process would be much different from simply replacing fibreglass fabric with kevlar and maintaining the same overall process.

    Also if anyone could help me out with coring, that is a new concept for me and I am pretty unsure if it is even possible or practical for a home-build operation.

    Thanks
     
  2. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    This book, although from the seventies, (but updated in the eighties) will give you all the info you need to make some boats. (Used copies from $8) It covers resins, cloths, processes, lamination schedules and all is explained in language people new to it all can understand.
    http://www.amazon.com/Boatbuilders-Manual-Charles-C-Walbridge/dp/0897320220

    [​IMG]

    BTW, what you have is a mold, not a plug and by having the mold you have eliminated 3/4 of the work involved in making boats.

    If you scroll to the bottom of this page you will see other threads about what you want to do, and if you search (especially in the 'fiberglass and composite boatbuilding' section), there is a lot more. Use terms like molds, moldmaking, canoes, kayaks, etc.
     
  3. Silver Raven
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Location: Far North Queensland, Australia

    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Gooday 'Canuck' - Weller - How's your search for info going?? There is much to learn before you start - that is if you wish to get it 1/2 right on the first go. With the costs of materials so high - it's a great idea to understand each & every step in the process long before you start. I was playing with 'plastics' just next door - in B.C. many years ago & have spent my life involved in the 'Reinforced Plastics Industry'. Good fortune in your search for info & do - please keep us informed. Ciao, james
     
  4. wet feet
    Joined: Nov 2004
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    Location: East Anglia,England

    wet feet Senior Member

    Before you build the kevlar canoe it might be helpful to build a basic glass version.You will be able to get a better understanding of the quirks of your particular hull shape at less expense.It is also a lot easier to work with than kevlar.Good luck with the project.
     
  5. variverrunner
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: New York, USA

    variverrunner Junior Member

  6. wellerj
    Joined: Apr 2012
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    Location: Alberta

    wellerj New Member

    Haha.. the confidence in me is inspiring, perhaps a fibreglass option is wise.. but perhaps a challenge is worth it, I'll keep learning before I decide. Thanks for the help folks.
     

  7. variverrunner
    Joined: Dec 2009
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    Location: New York, USA

    variverrunner Junior Member

    WellerJ,

    Working with kevlar is only slightly more more difficult than fiberglass and easily within anyones reach.

    Differences:

    1. Cutting kevlar requires special scissors and a bit more time.

    2. Wetting out Kevlar takes a bit more care because it does not turn transparent when wet out.

    3. Attempts to conventionally sand kevlar will cause it to fuzz up into a unpleasant scruffy mess, rough enough to take the skin off your knuckles in a flash.
     
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