Keel Material

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by lewisboats, Sep 5, 2006.

  1. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 2,329
    Likes: 129, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1603
    Location: Iowa

    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Looking for opinions on what I should make the keel out of on the boat I am building. First and foremost...the boat will be lucky to last 5 years. For everyone who wants to say something about it lasting longer...It is a proof of concept build (I am also developing plans and building method out of the build), it isn't being built out of materials that will last (too long), I don't want it hanging around all that long taking up much needed (to built other boats) space. It might even end up as mulch before it hits 5 if I don't like it or find something I just gotta build or I need to build something else to develop plans.

    My options for keel material are limited in the middle of corn country. I have scoped out mahogany (1x6"x8' =$30 + lots of laminating and seams), 1x12x8 Ash ($50 and some laminating) and 5/4 Red Oak (1" true x 12" x 8' = $45/board) which would only require routing out for the swing part of the keel (3/8-1/2" steel) and is nice and heavy in itself. If I used PU glue to glue the faces together I could get the keel out of 2 planks of the 5/4, whereas I would need 3 or more of the other stuff. I know red oak has nothing on the white for rot resistance, but do you think it might last for 4-5 years if properly sealed and painted?

    Steve Lewis

    The boat in question is here...top picture:

    http://www.angelfire.com/ego/lewisboatworks/html/GuppyIIbuildnav.htm
     
  2. skyl4rk
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 59
    Likes: 12, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 21
    Location: Lake Michigan

    skyl4rk Junior Member

    I would use BC fir plywood, using epoxy laminations to reach the appropriate thickness. Cover with woven roving and an outer layer of glass cloth.

    Thats a cool looking design!
     
  3. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 1,418
    Likes: 58, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 584
    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Yellow pine is strong, heavy, rot resistant and cheap. The larger sizes of 2x material at Lowe's (hiss) and others is generally yellow pine and with a little searching, you can find something with good grain density and few if any knots.

    OSHA has a standard set for scaffold planking. If you can locate scaffold planking at your local lumber store, you'll a good, high quality board. The only short coming on them is that they are only 10' or 12' long. They cost a little more than standard 2x, but are less than oak.

    We have a roof truss builder here in DooDaa (Wichita) that uses a "stuctural" grade of yellow pine that is knot free and straight grained, but don't confuse "stuctural" grade with "construction" grade. Structural grade is far superior. The only problem is this might make your boat last more that five years. Sorry. ;)

    Happy building.
     
  4. longliner45
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 1,629
    Likes: 73, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 505
    Location: Ohio

    longliner45 Senior Member

    white oak barn beams
     

  5. cbboatworks
    Joined: Sep 2006
    Posts: 19
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Wilmington NC

    cbboatworks Junior Member

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