Just How Safe Is MingMing2

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Letsgosailing, Sep 17, 2018.

  1. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    ‘‘ . . . RHP + Achilles 24 = Singapore to Liverpool . . . my good lady wife thinks I'm mad . . . ’’

    That's because she's afraid of pirates Richard, and she didn't think of the 4th option yet...

    1 going west and through the Suez Canal = Pirates in the Strait of Malacca and from Somalia . . :eek:

    2 going west and rounding Cape Agulhas = Pirates from Nigeria . . :eek:

    3 going east and through the Panama Canal = Pirates from Colombia . . :eek:

    4 going east and rounding Cape Horn = no Pirates yet . . :cool:
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2018
  2. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    It’d have to be the Horn, what a wasted opportunity not to do so but in summer of course....
     
  3. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Agulhas and the Horn both can be ferocious, but often Agulhas is unjustly more underestimated.
     
  4. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    Another Achilles 24 that went up into the artic.

     
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  5. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Thanks for the video Richard, the comments and answers are also interesting to read...

    Jay Tee
    ‘‘ . . . you seem to be sailing the same icy waters ming ming travels, what do you think to his junk rig set up ? . . . ’’

    Sean Beecher (the A-24 NIAMH skipper)
    ‘‘ The junk rig is a lot more manageable for single handed sailing, especially long distance sailing. There is less to go wrong. lt is worth reading about ming ming as she is a well tuned boat and sailed by a great seaman. ’’ - - ‘‘ ming ming 2 ’’
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2018
  6. Letsgosailing
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    Letsgosailing Junior Member

    Is this something you think can be improved upon by removal of fittings? I understand it has no standing room but I assume you can sit comfortably with a couple of friends.

    My thinking was that it should be able to last 50years in it's normal application - set rigid in concrete against the highest British winds. I would assume having the ability to roll with the vessel would mean it would be able to put up with even higher wind speeds (all assumption).


    That's what I like to hear. Are there any down points in it's handling or general keeping - anything at all?
     
  7. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Sure, but that's absolutely different from living there for some months with a couple of friends.
    If you build a brick then it will sail like a brick, the mast you describe will put CG (center of gravity) up and make the boat unstable unless more ballast is put in, if that ballast is concrete like you say around the mast then you'll need even more ballast because concrete is less dense than e.g. lead or steel, more ballast volume means a higher ballast CG, so you'll need even more ballast to bring the boat's overall CG down to the wanted level.

    ‘‘ . . . it should be able to last 50 years in it's normal application . . . ’’

    Ocean sailing means repairing all the time since the constant changing loads will worn everything out . . . .


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    . . . . however the need to repair all the time is far better than having it all failed at once . . . .



    ‘‘ Eddie Albert (1906-2005) reads "The Deacon's Masterpiece" or "The Wonderful One-Hoss Shay" by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (1809-1894) (from the 1962 Caedmon album "Great American Poetry"). Illustrations by Howard Pyle and H.M. Brock. ’’
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
  8. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    [​IMG]

    Video in English
    Laura Dekker: How to Conquer the World When Everyone Tells You "No"
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2018
  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    The above video is for a small part also about repairs and things breaking down even in calms combined with the ocean swell, as the rig is heavily flopping around then, which wears the moving and flopping parts out faster than with a constant heavy load.
     
  10. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    To get experience for the Southern Ocean best start autumn and winter sailing in storms on the Atlantic Ocean which is nearby to you, of course only do so if you're ready for that lower level yet.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
  11. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Last edited: Oct 8, 2018
  12. tlouth7
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    tlouth7 Junior Member

    I think the original point was that a lamppost is designed to survive high winds for 50 years while set into concrete at the side of a road. It should therefore be able to cope with similar loads* on a boat.

    *Obviously the wind load on a bare post is different to that experienced when sailing.
     
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  13. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Thanks Tlouth7, my bad, ‘‘normal’’ is an subjective term, which I've wrongly interpreted as the normal application as a mast which it is now, suggested to be set in concrete in the boat, you've made clear the original application as a lamppost was meant by Letsgosailing.

    About the application switch from lamppost to mast, Roger is known for the structural soundness and safety of his rebuilds and modifications, so I'm sure he has done his research here, and he's also known to have a plan B to master the situation in case it fails in extreme circumstances.

    If I remember correctly from some of Roger's videos or writings or interviews or lectures, the lamppost was shortened in its conversion to a freestanding mast, which reduces the bending moment at the mast deck passing when compared to its original length, so this could be an adaption to its new application.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2018
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