Junk rig on modern hulls

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by BATAAN, Sep 2, 2011.

  1. micah719
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 30
    Likes: 7, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 92
    Location: Somewhere in Germany

    micah719 Plotting Dreamer

    Thanks to Arne and the other Junk Rig Pioneers for publishing their research and experimentation.

    I have beginner's questions: How much adjustment is necessary to the sail control lines when reefing or making large changes in sheeting, and how often?

    Related to that, what has proved to be the best way to manage all the loose ends of rope? I was thinking of fitting spools downstream of the cleats to take up all the slack and keep things tidy; all of the control lines accessible from the main hatch. Adding in self steering, it's going to get messy...

    Further, is there any way of gaining the ability to heave to? My thought was to have a double sheet system rather than single leach sheeting, and to have the attachment points to the hull on tracks adjustable fore & aft....giving the ability to haul the sail to windward for more maneuvering options.
     
  2. Arne Kverneland
    Joined: Jan 2014
    Posts: 18
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: Stavanger, Norway

    Arne Kverneland Junior Member

    Micah 719 (..why on earth don't people use their real names here?..)

    Here, if I am lucky, this link should take you to a little write-up, called "Junk Rig for Beginners":

    http://goo.gl/vzGLzi.

    As you will see, I just use four running lines on my rigs (plus a new, experimental one, lately, called FUP, "fan-up preventer"). The four lines are
    halyard, sheet, throat hauling parrel (=upper luff h.p.), and yard hauling parrel. The two last lines are used for trimming the set and position of the hoisted yard. They need no retrimming as the sheet is handled, but if the sail is reefed or unreefed, they must be readjusted afterwards, of course.

    Heaving to is mentioned in that little write-up as well.

    Hope this makes sense.
    Arne
     
  3. micah719
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 30
    Likes: 7, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 92
    Location: Somewhere in Germany

    micah719 Plotting Dreamer

    Thanks for the reply, and the info. Is the idea for the spools for taking up loose lines worth pursuing? And the double sheets? It's a little hard to try out here, 1000km from the sea in darkest Teutonia. Running thought experiments only goes so far, and the only patch of water here is a waist deep football pitch with DiY wind.

    Best Regards,

    Stefan
     
  4. Arne Kverneland
    Joined: Jan 2014
    Posts: 18
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: Stavanger, Norway

    Arne Kverneland Junior Member

    Stefan,
    I have had 4 boats with sloop JRs, so far. I have seen halyards being coiled on spools and that worked well. On my boats I stuff the halyard in in the halyard bag (canvas) after hoisting the sail. This ensures trouble-free furling of the sail. When the sail has been lowered, the halyard bag is almost empty, so then I store the tails of the luff and yard parrels in them. I also have a bag where I stuff the sheet after the sail has been lowered. While sailing, the sheet stays on the cockpit floor, not mixed with the halyard, which, as said, is in its bag. I have not bothered with, nor felt the need for, separate port-starboard sheets on my own boats. I know of one who has separate upper-lower sheets on his big (70sqm) mainsail of his schooner, Samson. That works well (see photo of Samson, below).

    Arne

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=101803&stc=1&d=1438694993
     

    Attached Files:

  5. micah719
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 30
    Likes: 7, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 92
    Location: Somewhere in Germany

    micah719 Plotting Dreamer

    Lovely boat, and a very interesting picture too! Is it ferro? It looks close-hauled in light winds and moving nicely.

    The sails are on opposite sides of the mast...fore is starboard, main is port; yet the mainsail, apart from the lowest panel, doesn't look much affected by the mast. Has anyone in the west ever tried more pronounced offset masts? I've read the Chinese sometimes had some stepped practically at the rail.

    Thanks again,

    Stefan.
     
  6. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
    Posts: 541
    Likes: 9, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 117
    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    The other thing that must be fun to play with is mast rake.
     

  7. Arne Kverneland
    Joined: Jan 2014
    Posts: 18
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: Stavanger, Norway

    Arne Kverneland Junior Member

    Stefan,
    yes, Samson is a ferro boat, based on the 45' Samson C-Deuce, stretched to 49' (Disp= 23ton). The sails are 70 + 37sqm with about 10% camber in the foresail and 8 in the main. This has proven to be both powerful and surprisingly close-winded. The foremast has quite some forward rake to move the foresail foreward. Still, generally I prefer vertical masts if I can. This generally makes handling, hoisting, reefing and furling easier than with raked masts.

    Arne

    The attached photo is from a junkrig rally in Stavanger, in Aug 2008.
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=101822&stc=1&d=1438757894
     

    Attached Files:

Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.