John welsfords trover plywood boat

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Paul D, Jun 11, 2019.

  1. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Paul D Junior Member

    Hello everyone ...
    Just wondering what people's thoughts are on John welsfords trover design?...beam is 1.4metres....17ft length...8 to 30hp
    Screenshot_20190611-192539_Chrome.jpg Screenshot_20190611-192632_Chrome.jpg Screenshot_20190611-192559_Chrome.jpg
    Any advice about characteristics of hull design stability?...riding thru chop?...etc
    I'm thinking of this design for ease of build and reasonably cheap to build ...
    Uses will river fishing..shallow waters...load carrier...also launching off beach for near shore sea fishing with 2 people....I think its suited just be good to get some expert advice and opinions of what to expect from the hull design...its mainly stability I'm worried about being a narrow design
    Thanks Paul
     
  2. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    When launching off a beach, will it always be very calm or will you occasionally encounter a shore break?
    If the latter, then it might be better to have a pointed bow rather than a bluff bow as shown in the photos?
     
  3. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    I only be launching off beach on calm days maybe 1 foot breakers at most....its mostly a sheltered beach where we launch....thanks
     
  4. Yellowjacket
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    Yellowjacket Senior Member

    Both this and Diablo are both very similar in that they have a narrow planing surface and a shallow V outboard. Very good for low to moderate power in that they are efficient with by nature of the flat planing surface but don't ride as roughly as a full flat bottom planing hull. They are both more efficient than a full V with the same deadrise and don't ride much rougher. For relatively smooth water they are a good compromise...
     
  5. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks for the info good to know ....I'm guessing that these hull designs like the trover and diablo will feel a little tippy lightly loaded but still be reasonably safe boat stability wise?....
    The trovers beam is only 1.4m but I guess that has some pros to it...
     
  6. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    The boat appears to have a Trapeze bottom. That is to say that it has a fairly narrow horizontal flat surface and a steeply angled first to second chine. That is an excellent section shape to minimize wetted surface. Lower wetted surface results in better performance at lower speeds. The design will not plane as easily as one with a wider bottom surface but it will also ride more comfortably. It will have less initial stability (lateral) than a wide flat bottom but it will gain stability when tilted over a bit. The design will work well with modest propulsion horsepower if you are not in too much of a hurry.
     
  7. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks for info messabout....i was worried about stability with pulling a fish in over the sides etc but good to know it should have good secondary stability...Im also wondering about the blunt pram bow and if theres any advantages to them?..
    I know they give u more volume for size of boat...just worried by chance I catch a small breaker into that blunt bow guess it would help in lift but it won't slice thru?...cherz
     
  8. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    They go together pretty ok & are economical on sheets. I wouldn't worry to much about punching through the odd wave that pram bow is small & regardless of what small skiff driving into a chop you're going to get some spray. I've got one in my shed waiting or some time & small longshaft engine & looking forward to it down the track.

    Jeff
     
  9. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    There is a descriptive term used by the enthusiasts of the Puddle Duck Racer (PDR) the puddle duck has a blunt bow and if driven too hard and the weight distribution is not ideal, the blunt bow will stuff its nose into an oncoming wave or wake. They call it "pig rooting". Think of a pig who has a compulsion to stuff his/her nose into the ground and plow up some dirt. They are trying to unearth acorns or other edibles. In the case of the boat......well there are few if any acorns down there.

    Not to worry, the boat is designed well and the prospect of "pig rooting" is minimal. Welsford knows his stuff and I figure that he has taken all that into account in such a way that no serious wave smashing is likely to happen with regularity. In the worst case scenario: Yes. You are likely to get wet. Pointed boats are not immune from smashing into a wave and wetting its occupants.
     
  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    That is where the attraction lies, and if you can live with the compromises inherent in that, a fair bargain.
     
  11. Paul D
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    Paul D Junior Member

    Thanks for advice really appreciate it .....I think the trover will suit my needs then being reasonably economical to build which is the main priority ...got to keep the wife happy....and having a good shallow draft will suit river fishing here aswell...having the ability to near shore fish at sea on calm days is a bonus to .. ..was thinking of building a small Garvey type hull for the river here but I think a design like the trover will have more uses and built well should last a long time...anyway thanks for your time everyone really appreciate the advice on here ..hopefully I will get building soon and finished before the new fishing season starts....thanks
     
  12. Yellowjacket
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    Yellowjacket Senior Member

    Actually, if you want to these designs can actually handle a lot more power and can go like hell if overpowered... For instance that bottom shape is almost exactly the same as my "D" APBA stock racing runabout, which with a 55 hp motor and a racing lower unit with a surfacing prop will go close to 80 mph.. Not that you'd want to go that fast, and it would take some a stronger transom to take that much power, but you get the idea. There was one person who built a Diablo and ran a 40 or 50 hp motor on it and he said it was a pretty good handling boat even at speeds of close to 50 mph. Of course it would pound like crazy at higher speeds, and the guy with the Diablo said it eventually started to come apart in old age, but he was jumping waves and getting the entire boat out of the water... Sill, on a smooth lake that hull shape can fly, literally....
     
  13. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    Im also wondering about the blunt pram bow and if theres any advantages to them?..
    Quite handy for pushing onto a pontoon/whatever for passenger pickup.
    J.
     

  14. Paul D
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Paul D Junior Member

    I'm looking to power it with a 18 to 20hp outboard ...I could get myself in a bit of trouble with a 50hp I'd say.... but good to know what the hull designs capable of thanks
     
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