Jet Boat Wont Start!!!!

Discussion in 'Jet Drives' started by Skylerreichard, Sep 19, 2016.

  1. Skylerreichard
    Joined: Sep 2016
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    Location: Indiana

    Skylerreichard New Member

    I have a 2001 Sugar Sand Tango 4+2 with the v6 mercruiser 210hp, EFI. It used to start up after a few cranks but now it takes forever. Plugs are fairly new like 2-3 summers on them. Full fuel, oil is full. There is no primer on it, the choke is built into the ignition. It cranks over with no problem but for some reason it just takes a million cranks to start. Sometimes it will start for a second or two, then it dies. I'm not sure what to look when it comes to jet boats. Anyone know of anything or have the same issue?
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    The first part you buy for a boat is the repair manual. If working on the engine/drive is above you, then a mechanic is needed. There are simple, logical procedures to follow, which will tell you where to look for further information, if not a cause of the issue(s). The manual will nurse you through it, if this is your cup of tea. I'll bet it's a fuel delivery issue, but this is guessing , given the information you've provided. There's very little difference between a jet boat and a conventional drive, in regard to the way they start.
     
  3. Skylerreichard
    Joined: Sep 2016
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    Location: Indiana

    Skylerreichard New Member

    Do you know where i could find a repair manual for my model ?
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are dozens of online resources, as well as brick and mortar outlets.
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Have you changed the fuel filters?
     
  6. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    In 2001 there should be an OBD port somewhere on the engine. You can have a mechanic plug in a computer into the On Board Diagnostic port and get an answer within minutes.
    If not check for spark and fuel to the injectors

    On a 2004 350 Chevy, we had a sensor that adjusted the advance with varying loads and rpm fail. The engine had fuel and spark but would not start. As we were 25 miles up a river in western Canada and another 90 from a marina, we had to get a helicopter to get the boat out. Thanks the stars for sat phones. (and room on the Visa for an $11,000 lift charge)
     
  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The fuel and mechanical troubleshooting should be always done before plugging anything into the diagnostic port.
     
  8. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Helps if you give more info...did it just start doing this all of a sudden,or after sitting?
    If after sitting,your gas may have gone bad which may have gunked the injectors up. If all of a sudden,there's lots of things.
     
  9. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: New York

    missinginaction Senior Member

    Not to stray too far off topic but you're story explains why I keep my carburetor and points and condenser ignition system. I'm told that even a direct lightening strike is unlikely to knock me out of action. Of course if the points burned up I can easily install a new set and get up and running with a feeler gauge.
     

  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I use to be in MIA's camp, but no longer. I'm old enough to remember the "good 'ol days" where replacing plugs every 10K miles, changing wires, grinding down point contacts and carrying a spare condenser (just in case) was mandatory. I'm over it and glad for the electronic processors that now govern modern engines.

    Unlike Gonzo, the first thing I do on a newer engine is pull the current and previously stored codes, from the ECU. This usually gives me an idea where to look first, if not a pretty good idea of what is wrong. If you have more than just a code reader and can get into the ECU code and real time switching/sensing, I have a real advantage of nailing down the issue(s), before I pull a wrench from the box.

    This new architecture can be intimidating to some, but it's not all that hard, once you get your head around the processes. It's really the same as it was, back in the 80's, but all the vacuum controlled dashpots and pulloff devices have been replaced with solenoids, relays and contactors. I recently had to get a second gen, LT1 up and running, without an ECU. Impossible right. Nope, you can do it, but you do need to fool around with about 2 dozen electrical connections and a dozen or so devices, all desiring some communication with the ECU. With a laptop, I was able to get the engine up and running (in "limp mode") and had I more time (and desire) I could have fixed it into a specific operational range (temperature, air/fuel, timing, RPM, etc.). This is wholly different than the 3 wires I need to get a first gen 350 up and running, but this is just the tip of the iceberg. I know guys that can bust into the ECU, rewrite code and take a 240 HP 5.7 Chevy and make it produce 400 HP, without changing any of the reciprocating pieces! In the old days, we needed a new cam, new intake, new carb, headers and some serious prayer, to squeeze another 40% more HP out of a 350, but not now. Hell, you can make a serious 500 HP engine and still get close to 30 MPG in your car! Try that with points and a carb.

    The OP needs to either take his boat to someone that has the tools and a clue or he can try to muddle through the diagnostics in the manual. I'm betting the boat has been simply run, until it doesn't like to start any more, with very little of the usual maintenance necessary. I see these types of owners all the time and they have no idea and are quite surprised with the basics. After I get the boat running good again, I hand them a bill and a bottle of Sta-Bil.
     
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