Jazz 30, sheathed plywood power cat

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by xellz, Nov 17, 2019.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    That is an awful lot of hours, fallguy. Did you anticipate that ?
     
  2. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    No. I expected it would take 2 years. My hip failure added say 3 months, so 2 years and 3 months would have been my expectation. I am just a bit beyond that now, but will scramble now for a spring launch as the hull painting has destroyed my time budget.

    It is amateur hour, mind you.

    Things like painting a hull to high standards are really difficult for noobs. Ask me how I know. You can get a workboat finish very easy, but my boat is really in the $250k class of boat, so I was hoping it would look like it. Yesterday, I ordered some more special sandpapers and that will be here late Thursday, so we backfill until then. A lot of time backfill work needs to be done anyway, but vendor delays really can kill a schedule. I really need one hull out of the building to build the cabin. Vendor delays will be far worse for a man stranded on a Japanese isle as he already knows. And we have Amazon prime, so I get a lot of stuff same day here. I use a lot of gloves on this project. I probably needed to budget like 500 for gloves alone; that was an epic budget miss. Now that I have a sensitivity to epoxy, I can't take any chances at all. I am also wearing an organic mask when I mix as the vapors coming up from the pot are bothering me as well.

    Space considerations are a huge clock killing issue as well. I don't have enough room to build the boat assembled in my building; it is just too high and lifting the cabin off and on will require a crane. Right now, the cabin is sitting outside in my front yard and yesterday I spent 2 hours building a cradle to move it into the building with ease. We used a tractor to move it built halfway up (the top half won't require the hulls eh) off my vac table between the hulls to the ground outside. Anyhow, I worked 2 hours on a cradle last nite 4-6pm and scrapped the method after 2 hours and realize I have to use some steel. Fortunately, I have the material, but there is a ton of learning when you are building something as complex as a demountable powercat. And I don't weld, so it'll take me a couple hours to drill 16 holes in all the steel components for the cradle versus welding on brackets I can make on a drill press.

    There were so many things I didn't account for in time budgeting; it is rather humorous. I had to build a gantry with an I beam so I could roll the hulls over. They were simply too big to manhandle and flip. When you get up into this 10 meter range; things just get so much heavier and awkward and I wanted more control over the flips. I never realized that need I spent about $500 on parts and was lucky to have some of the materials here. So it was a budget miss as well. Now with all the structural work done, the hull weight is about #1500 pounds before engines, fuel and accessories. Way too much to lift. We had a cradle fail and had to use the gantry to pick the hull back up as it fell over and hit the crane and then I made sure my cradles were stronger. I didn't think a 6" lag bolt would pull out of end grain, but end grain is fully useless I realize (amateur hour again). The boat got on small ding fixable with fairing compound; got lucky there.

    And someone might say I could be working now instead of blabbing on boatdesign, but I am 53 this month and my legs can't go 12 hours, so I spend plenty of time resting. When you have a hip replaced, often the opposite knee fails and I am going to see the surgeon today to see if I can get out of knee pain.

    Probably wise to add 30-50% to your time budgets. So, for xellz, he said 12-14. I'll consider the 12 unreal and go for the 14, then add 50% to 21 months. I was nice and suggested 18 is more real. His ply build should be WAY faster; not sure about the circ saw.. :(
     
  3. xellz
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    xellz Senior Member

    I can measure everything alone just fine, i used this method many times before single handed. Nothing complicated, just need long enough hose, clamps and a stand, preferably with a boom arm to move hose as close as possible to a piece that will be adjusted. This way it's fast and precise. Weight string is even more simpler. I just have some trust issues for cheap laser levels, way too many mixed reviews and for such a small job getting a professional one doesn't make sense. If luck is on my side, i might be able to borrow pro tools for bulkheads setup time.

    If there will be too much waiting time might as well start working on second hull, plan for doing those jobs before other tasks not related to boat etc. One of reasons i decided to spend extra on a shed right beside home. I can also adjust my actual work time rather freely, i.e. if i want i can work full day on boat, other days break down 5-6h for boat in 3 parts and the rest earn some cash/help at home. On average 6-7h/day i want to spend on boat. How much break time i'll need during a year is still difficult to tell. Why i like Jazz30 design, there are no complicated shapes or difficult to make parts, yet end result should be good. I don't see much of a compromise for a fast build here, expect it's plywood base. For some plywood might be a big nono. Rough estimation is 500h per hull, 2000h for complete build. For the beginning i won't be installing more than engines, fishfinder/gps unit and items required by law, such as lights.

    Anyway, time will tell. The only thing i'm worrying now is to get glass layup correctly, plans are minimalistic with bare minimum information. So a bit difficult to understand for a novice in boat building. I think i got all questions sorted out, but in case i missed something Richard said it's fine to ask anytime if a problem comes up.


    But it's sure is super exiting, i never did such a big project single handed before. Waiting for materials to arrive turned out to be quite difficult because of this.
     
  4. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I spent the entire day building a cart to move the cabin around due to space problems.

    I had a helper, so double my hours; then one of the timbers broke, so I gotta get a better one or a laminated one tomorrow!

    Moving the cabin is a space issue. A bigger shop and it would be on the boat, but my head clearance is only 13' in my building and the cabin is higher than that off the ground.

    Not to hijack, just explain some realities. I don't consider it boat building.

    This is a half height cabin because we could not build it all the way up and get it off the hulls!

    5333FC69-97D3-44FD-999B-75B532846805.jpeg
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    There is a lot to be said for looking for short-cuts, provided they are practical, I also think pre-fab cored panels which might cost more, but save much time, are a good idea in GRP construction.
     
  6. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    BF0B541C-5180-4B7D-8143-6022DC865FAB.jpeg

    The other time killer is fairing. Talk about amateur hour.

    After two coats of primer, we broke down for the torture board.

    we have had the boat in for fairing nearly 10 weeks with two weeks off or so; we need some compound and a coat of paint on the tortured sections and then sanding again with say 180 and then another coat and sand again and then a final coat of primer, but learning curve is steep here and a workboat finish is easy, while even a semi-pro finish hard.

    We are using flexisander long board and abranet mesh..
     

  7. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Getting a multi chine boat chine laying fair is also tricky. There is literally nothing to do right unless the chine is low in the guide coat unless you fill the entire section. Very big pita.

    This high spot can be filled down a bit.

    26E19F6D-BDF1-4B17-BC0C-E0F22CE16700.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2019
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