It was great while it lasted...

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by CatBuilder, Apr 9, 2011.

  1. cthippo
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: Bellingham WA

    cthippo Senior Member

    We had half an inch of snow on the ground yesterday morning :(
     
  2. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    How about 3 or 4 $90 Walmart window rattlers? Save yourself $5000 bucks and spend it on electricity. Mount them on a plywood box fastened to the tent sides in 4 places. Keep a fan at the end like the above drawing shows to keep changing out the air, the way they do on chicken farms. It will help lower the temp too, especially if you have a big block of ice in front of it.
     
  3. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Rub it in, you leg-Yank-ers.
     
  4. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I know. It's so strange, isn't it? Such a dramatic difference in weather... none of it good for boat building! :)
     
  5. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

  6. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I thought about the window rattlers, but when I added up the cost of them vs tonnage output, the home central air system came in less expensive and also was less money to run. Plus... nothing to build. Just a little bit of duct work.

    The fan doesn't lower my temps at all. I have one and used it last summer. It doesn't get any hotter in the building than the outside temperatures when I leave the doors open on the ends with no fan on. The problem is (as I'm sure you're more than aware :D ) is that the outside temperature is routinely 100 deg F in June, July and August. Also, the humidity out out of control.

    I'd like to have a good product in the end here, not something that was done half *ss. So, I need to control the manufacturing environment.
     
  7. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    On the other hand, when the thief comes to steal your coil and copper tubing while you are away, you will be worse off. I get at least one call a week from a customer needing a quote on a new one for that very reason.
     
  8. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member


    A quote from a customer? Are you able to get air conditioning units?!? :D

    I could do the window rattlers, I guess, but won't someone steal all 10 of those air conditioners too?
     
  9. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    There is no real defense against theft except vigilance. Just try to make it difficult for them. As to getting the units, I wish! We just paid full price for a new system here. We got a good deal though, so don't jump at the first offer. Get at least 2, better 3 bids, then decide.
     
  10. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Yeah, I do have pretty good theft deterrents here, actually. :D

    Ample lighting, my presence 24/7, cameras, weapons if any actual conflict develops and the watchful eye of other people in the area.

    It's actually a pretty secure location.

    What about just ordering one online and setting it up myself? Or... do they not come pre-charged?

    My vacuum pump is up north. :(
     
  11. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Looks like air conditioning is out.

    I need 10 tons.

    That seems to be $2500/mo to run it. Same cost as heating a tent up north would have been. Also, the units are at least $8000.

    Guess I'm down to night shifts and dehumidifiers. :(
     
  12. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Big fans are worth their weight in gold. Blocks of ice in the corners of the tent will actually cool and dehumidify the air, and you can keep your drinks cold on them at the same time, which you will need to keep from de-humidifying yourself.
     
  13. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Hoyt, I am not understanding this.

    You are saying blocks of ice, which will leave evaporating puddles around on the floor, are going to lower my humidity? By how much and what is the mechanism?

    I already have a big fan. It's next to useless. It's nice to have a breeze on you to evaporate your sweat, but that doesn't work at all inside of a Tyvek suit because they are impermeable to wind or particles larger than 1 micron. Other safety gear gets you pretty hot too. The fan also doesn't cool the building because the building is always the same temperature as the air is outside. It's not like I can bring cooler air inside by using a fan. All it does is move the same temperature air around a bit.

    I have, however, come up with a plan.

    I realized today there are a number of problems. All could be addressed with an air conditioner. However, I could also break the problems apart and deal with each individually for a more affordable fix.

    Problems and solutions:

    Epoxy is going off to fast

    Solution: Cool epoxy. Get a cheap refrigerator for the shop to keep 5 gallon jugs of epoxy in, taking them out just before I start the epoxy job.

    I am overheating in Hazmat Suit

    Solution: Cool self only. I had already put my forced air respirator intake in a small plywood box with a 5000 BTU air conditioner. It only reduced the temperature of the incoming air a few degrees for some reason. I guess that has to do with pressure differentials in the air supplied to my suit. That didn't work. However, I am going to buy one of these on Monday to wear inside the Hazmat suit -

    [​IMG]
    http://www.stacoolvest.com/industrial-cooling-vest.php

    They are worn by firefighters regular hazmat people and the US military in the Middle East to avoid heat exhaustion. Should work for me as well.

    Environment too Humid

    Solution: A large, industrial dehumidifier. I'll just dehumidify the place and not worry too much about the temperature. If I work the overnight shift, I can have cooler temperatures and a dry working environment. If I work day shift in 100 degree heat with chilled epoxy and a cooling vest, the high heat of the day will keep the humidity down to reasonable levels much of the time.


    So, the solution was to take incremental steps to solve small individual problems rather than go at it with a single (but better) solution.

    This stuff will cost 10% of air conditioning.
     
  14. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Colonial "Sick Africa"

    Fanie Fanie

    How big is this thing you're building ?
     

  15. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member


    13.75 meters x 7.62 meters for the boat, 18.25 meters x 9 meters is the building that I am working inside of.
     
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