Isuzu C240

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by thom wessels, Jun 28, 2007.

  1. thom wessels
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    thom wessels Junior Member

    Greetings all. New member. I have an Isuzu C240 (year unk, probably around mid 80's) in my sailboat and it is such a sweet, tight engine I want to protect it to the best of my ability.

    I understand there is an optimal RPM. Anyone know the BEST (crankshaft) RPM and temperature (taken at the thermostat housing, I suppose) for this engine?

    Additionally, at what vacuum psi should I replace fuel filters? I have installed a 0-30 vacuum gauge after the filters so I can read it on the dashpanel.
    Thanx
     
  2. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Anyone know the BEST (crankshaft) RPM and temperature (taken at the thermostat housing, I suppose) for this engine?

    Usually the rated torque peak , or a hundred RPM either way is best fuel use.

    High temps , 180 or so are best , esp with engines in an aux as they frequently sit unused for long periods.

    FF
     
  3. thom wessels
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    thom wessels Junior Member

    Thanx, F. Fred. I'll look for a service book that shows the torque curve for that engine.
    Re: temp - right now I think it's low - around 160 or so. I'll get a higher thermostat and use a laser thermometer at the housing.

    Thom Wessels
     
  4. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    If the engine is sea water cooled , you're in the high side 140 bangs the salt out.

    If (as I expect) its fresh water cooled 180 would be better choice.

    FF
     
  5. thom wessels
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    thom wessels Junior Member

    Roger, Wilco, F. Fred.
    Any thoughts on max vacuum psi as applies to fuel filter changes? I am looking for the range to know when to change the filter element.
    Thom
     
  6. MMNet SEA
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    MMNet SEA Junior Member

    -------------------------------------------
    Hello Thom,

    The Marinized C240 Isuzu Industrial Engine is a very good engine insofar that it is naturally aspirated , unlike turbo aspiration which has to run at a higher RPM to work efficiently.

    This engine runs well at 1,800/1,900 RPM in terms putting out acceptable sound DB's , optimum fuel consumption ; producing around 28.5 HP.

    At 2,600 RPM it puts out close to 35 HP.

    Diesel Engines run best at high temps (obviously not boiling - but hot)

    As always a good idea, when running this engine for long periods at a set RPM, to increase the RPM to say 2,500 RPM for 10 minutes every hour. This will help in preventing bore glazing of the cylinders.
     

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    Last edited: Jul 3, 2007
  7. thom wessels
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    thom wessels Junior Member

    Good info

    Thanx for the helpful response. Still hope to hear back about the vacuum issues I'm having, too!
    tw
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2007
  8. MMNet SEA
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    MMNet SEA Junior Member

    Hi Thom,

    You don't tell us what filter/s you have, or even more importantly if you have a water separator ????
    What is the engine usuage time - hours/month ???
     
  9. Çemberci
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    Çemberci Senior Member

  10. thom wessels
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    thom wessels Junior Member

    Right. Well, I have (2) small Racor(s) separator, each with clear plastic bowl underneath filter element for water gathering purposes. I probably use the motor 10-20 hours a month. (I sail, I motor, I sail, I motor, etc...).

    The filter element is, I think, 10 microns going to a 2 micron final(engine mounted)filter element.

    Thom
     
  11. MMNet SEA
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    MMNet SEA Junior Member

    Hi Thom,

    Check out this website for info on the Rocors :-
    http://www.parker.com/racor/productCatalog/2007/7480G CD (04-16-2007) 269.pdf

    From your initial post it is understood that the fuel is delivered to the engine by suction. This is where the difficulty starts in terms of using a vacuum gauge to determine the state of the 2 micron filter. Let's say for example that the setup is to suck distilled water via the 2 micron filter from a header tank 5ft above the pump, you would expect a reading on the vacuum gauge
    of 0" Hg., the same reading for clean diesel. However, if one is having to suck the fuel via your 2 micron filter from a tank which is lower than the engine and the filter, then the reading might show 3" Hg. So what is necessary is to take a reading with a new clean filter passing clean diesel from a clean temporary container - this reading becomes your systems base line. Eg... if you establish that the systems datum is 2" Hg - then you will know that if you read 9" hg - Change the filter.
    Remember that the use of a vacuum gauge is an indicator not a predictor.
    If your tank/s is 20 years old and you are able to access the innards, it might be an idea to use up the majority of the fuel - then decant the rest - clean the tanks - add new fuel plus a biocide - change the filters every 3 months.

    A better site than the Racor is :-

    http://gulfcoastfilters.com/F-1 Fuel Filter Assembly.htm
     
  12. thom wessels
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    thom wessels Junior Member

    Thanx. I think I was initially too brief, so I'll try to 'splain better.
    Here goes;
    The fuel tanks are new, located about 24" above the motor, gravity feeding to the primary Racor (10 micron) filter(s).

    From there, fuel continues to drop by gravity to the motor, another 18".

    I have teed into the fuel line just after the primary filter for the dash panel vacuum gauge (0-30).

    The final (2 micron) filter is mounted on the motor just before the injectors. I don't sample that one, but I change it once a year or so.

    This location should tell me what vacuum is created by ongoing clogging of the primary filter.

    I'm still a bit confused as to the drop dead, cut-off point that is considered 'too much' vacuum / time to change the filter.

    Thanks for any and all your input.

    Thom
     
  13. thom wessels
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    thom wessels Junior Member

    clarification of vacuum range...

    MMNetSea;

    looking closer at your reply, can I gather that the acceptable range may well be considered to be from between 2"Hg to 9"Hg?

    Thanx

    Thom
     
  14. MMNet SEA
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    MMNet SEA Junior Member

    Hi Thom , no, you cannot gather the above range - unless that range has been established from a determined base of 2" Hg. With your setup and new filter elements and pump that is functioning as per spec., the range should be :- 0" Hg <> 7" Hg.
    However it would make good sense to change the 2 micron filter if you read 6" Hg. Also only changing the 2 micron filter once per year is probably pushing your luck. There is one other factor to consider, and that is the accuracy of your vacuum gauge - depending where you are, you could have it checked.
     

  15. thom wessels
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    thom wessels Junior Member

    Thanx All!

    Got it, thank you (and Fast Fred and Oktay Cemberci) for the helpful info.

    Fair Winds!
    Thom
     
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