is this a real modern container ship hull shape? looks very unbalanced front to rear.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Squidly-Diddly, Sep 11, 2020.

  1. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    Its supposed to be an intercontinental fruit ship so maybe its a bit faster than others.

    Never seen a cargo ship with such lack of displacement aft. Maybe something to do with not jostling the fruit???

    Is it real or just poor drawing? 1599849119013.jpg
     
  2. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    .
    Here's the Golden Ray vehicle transport ship....

    [​IMG]

    Here it is after it fell over for some reason. It also looks like a pretty radical bottom shape for the load it hauls.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Vehicles and fruit (and to a certain extent any containerized goods shipping) are high-volume, low weight cargoes. Compare the shape to a modern bulk ship which carries much more volume through the midships. Generally modern stern lines are pinched due to the use of short shaft MLSDs and the need for propeller efficiency.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I am confident the centre of gravity will still be in the same vertical plane as the centre of buoyancy !
     
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  5. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Based on the picture of the Golden Ray...perhaps not...<roll eyes with tongue in cheek> Edit: After a moments introspection, perhaps you are correct...They are both on the same vertical Y-Z local plane at some X coordinate in the photo, just not both with the same Y coordinate....
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It does seem that the low-density cargo not only leads to a very different appearance above water, but below as well. The total displacement is obviously going to be a lot less than a vessel of similar waterplane dimensions, and draft, carrying dense cargo, like iron ore for example, that makes for more freedom in the shaping of the underbody. I've never seen what the huge cruise ships look like underneath, but one assumes they have more in common with the high bulk, light weight carriers. Then again, they would not want anything that tended to increase pitching or rolling motions, passenger comfort being important.
     
  7. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    They are also perishable goods, thus lines optimised for higher transit speeds.
     
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  8. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    True, vine berries (strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, etc...) being one of the few cargoes worth flying by air.
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    West Coast USA cherries are flown into Australia in the SH winter, I assume the citrus is sent by ship. Incredibly, high-value live fish are flown to Asia in tanks, presumably the water is not any more than required to keep them alive.
     
  10. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Here in the Pacific Northwest USA, fresh wild caught Copper River Salmon is flown in daily during the season...at about 30 $USD a pound, Alaska Airlines is funded off that.
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Some Asian markets seemingly have a penchant for seeing their dinner swimming in a tank before eating it, I guess that comes at the cost of paying for the air freight for the water. I have noticed the air freighted USA cherries are top-notch, it is a kind of guarantee of quality, inferior produce is not going to be air-freighted. Similarly only the best cherries get exported from Australia in the SH season. Which probably explains why we get left with the insipid ones !
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I assume that is a red salmon ? What passes for salmon over here is cage-farmed Atlantic salmon that is fed something that tints the flesh to a reddish hue, but would otherwise be grey ! Not comparable.
     
  13. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Yes, real pacific salmon...not dyed trout.
    Edit to add: Even here in the US, you have to watch out. In the PNW it will state on the menu "wild Pacific salmon" or "farm raised Atlantic salmon". In California, you might get such a note...on the east coast, you almost never get a heads up on the menu...But then again on the east coast, you can get gravlax or lox which is supposed to be atlantic salmon as smoked pacific salmon is too oily.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I think some of this "salmon" product is a bit like sausages, if you saw what went into making it, you might lose your appetite.
     

  15. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Good quality salmon.. can never be too oily :D
     
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