is this a good price to build this boat?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by TheChillPrince, May 2, 2016.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Well, no ! I can see how they evolved that way, cheap, simple build, stack easily etc, but lacking much reserve safety factor. I wonder how many went over, back in the day. And that would be curtains for the unfortunates on board.
     
  2. Waterwitch
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    Waterwitch Senior Member

    http://ngb.chebucto.org/Articles/dis-nf-fishermen-lost-at-sea.shtml

    I have wondered the same thing about the dory fleet. the website above has a brief listing of New Foundland fishermen lost at sea. Plenty of cases of capsized possibly over loaded dorie or dories that sank, as I had suspected. Although the schooners built for speed seem also to blame from other sources.
     
  3. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    They evolved to do a job. Historically as far as I can gather the earliest forms were built in the beginning of the 1500's by the the English West County boys for the Newfoundland inshore fishery. Dories were not initially used on the Grand Banks as there was so much fish it was simply caught on hand line from the full size ships. As the fish stocks dwindled the dory was adopted into the mother ship /dory concept to cover a larger area with more hooks. First with hand lines and as the fish became more scarce with long trawls of hundreds of baited hooks. The fact that these craft have been in use from the 1500's to present day in much the same form and from the inshore to the deep sea fishery speaks highly of their design. Considering they often returned to land or to the mothership loaded to within 6 to 8 inches freeboard and operating without life saving equipment or water tight compartments, one wonders why not more fishermen drowned. Just an amazing piece of kit bar none.

    The 6 to 8in. loaded freeboard is something to see on the old Grand Banks fishing films from the early 1900's. It's just mind boggling to see two men pitch forking cod, standing in a fully loaded dory with fish up to their knees with sea water lapping over the gunnels. You ask yourself how did they ever get it back from the trawl to the schooner and what is keeping it afloat.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    With fish sloshing around in the bottom of the boat, the stability would be worse still, not as bad as water sloshing around, but heading in that direction. One thing about these boats, they'd be unlikely to ship water in the direction of the long axis.
     
  5. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Are those dories built as one offs or as series production boats using patterns for all the components and assembly jigs? I'm guessing the latter. It makes a huge difference.
     
  6. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    Uniformity was important for each areas fleet of schooners otherwise replacements would not stack. I.E Lunenburg's dories were no doubt clones but might differ a little from St. John's or New Bedfords. You are correct it was achieved thru patterns and jigs. There were about 10 different serious dory builders in the small town I grew up in. They built for the lobster and in shore fishery and were primarily rowing/sailing with a few of the larger being fitted with a make & break (20 to 1 gas/oil mix) engine. The most beautiful were built by a dear old friend of mine Albert Parsons, who has long passed over the bar. Attached is one of his big motor dories which I converted into a sort of motor sailor. One of the most fun boats i,ve ever owned. Here's to you Albert, your boat building fame is now known world wide. ;)

    Interesting tid bit Albert's older brother Herb? Parsons was a radiator shop foreman for Henry Ford back in the early days.
     

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  7. TheChillPrince
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    TheChillPrince Junior Member

    the photo did not upload :p

    ETA : i see you fixed it, that is a beautiful boat. what kind of speeds did she reach?
     
  8. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    Displacement hull speed plus a little :D
     
  9. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    That's my point, we all seem to think of production boats in terms of current fiberglass construction but prior to that all the wood boats from builders such as Chriscraft, etc and including many series built smaller boats like the dories of Lunenberg were had very refined building systems that drastically reduced the time to build them when compared to one offs, even when built by experienced builders. Back in about 1980 I built all the tooling, templates and jigs required for building a lapstrake plywood powerboat of about 20ft for a startup manufacturer in Lacrosse WI called Murphy boatworks who had never built a boat befor and this was their first model, they went on to build a number of different models of the same style but did not last very long I don't think.
     
  10. CDBarry
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    CDBarry Senior Member

    About 30 years ago we built a cold molded 26' Monomoy whale boat in about 1,000 then the same boat planked and caulked in a bit less, just as a cost point. 500 hours seems a good bit too high, first guess is 1,000 * (13 / 26)^3 or 110 or so; not quite three weeks, but a loaded rate is going to be better than $50 / hr (most car places do $75 - 100), so we aren't to far off the $7,000.
     
  11. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    any overseas boat builders with rock solid reputations (run by Westerners?) in Thailand etc that could be trusted to take a set of such plans and produce a semi-quality boat, and have it shipped?
     
  12. TheChillPrince
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    TheChillPrince Junior Member

    that never even came into my mind, i really do hope someone responds to this. after seeing what daiquiri posted i have been looking around and they do indeed do nice work over there. :eek: but the shipping may just be too much though.
     

  13. valter.f
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    valter.f Junior Member

    Hi.... If you can spend a little more, maybe a more expensive project, but inside the intended size for you, easy to build and with the great advantage of being off shore you have the Edge Traker 426 by bowdidge marine,
    among others even simpler. A nice and modern design and if you build with foam and fiberglass will be easy, without the use of special cutting tools and will not reach this astronomical price.

    [​IMG][​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Valter Ferreira :)
     
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