Is there a perfect engine?

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by Northwindii, Mar 6, 2016.

  1. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    "the Detroits were considered fuel efficient when they were new (1986..."

    They may have been manufactured in 86 , but are really a 1930S design.

    You can take full power from front or rear , operate then Left or Right rotation , and chose which side is preferred for servicing.

    Nothing today has that utility. Or perhaps service life and ease to overhaul.

    Modern flyweight diesels are best chosen for vessels with overhead hatches to ease replacement .

    But if the boat IS properly set up for an overnight engine swop, the use of truck engines can really lower the operating machinery cost.
     
  2. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    the world has changed, I worked new ( 2000 yr) AHTS 80m vessels, the owner said plan to scrap them in 5 years is how they are budgeted for, which was possible as it was the peak of the daily rate then.
    I then worked on drilling semi sub, must have cost $500 million to build, only designed to last 10 years and after working on it most of us think less than that.
    I'll bet the EMD's will still be going if they dont get scrapped.
     
  3. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    Yes love them
     
  4. rubenova
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    rubenova Junior Member

    I have quite a list of "perfect" engines. I prefer to categorize. A low speed diesel has a soothing quality. Names include Atlas-Imperial, Gardner and any steam engine. Personality is won over by hit-and-miss engines popping, snorting and clacking mechanically. Engines with incredible "numbers." GM Diesel/Detroit Dieel with the sheer number built, incredible reliability, Gardner with an incredibly low BSFC (which I'm still trying to verify with any independent test), and low noise. The big Wartsila prime mover. The turbo-compound radial of world war 2. Versatility goes to the small block chev. I have owned a 283, 307, 327, 350, and 400 as well as the 4.3 version of the 350 that have all performed well. Some favor power, some economy, some a compromise. I love, LOVE, LOVE the sound of a straight 6! American OHV's are durable, stout and lovable...but an old Chrysler Crown flathead with water cooled exhaust is absolute music. Oddly for me, with my like of big power, most of my daily drivers have been 4 cylinders. Some favorites are Datsun 1200's, 1400's, Ford industrial 1600 was not just bullet proof but neglect and abuse proof...3 years of torture and ran like a top when sold. Allis-Chalmers WD tractor(before I had a drivers license), Model A in an old airport/seaport jitney (again, before I had my drivers license). I'm sure there are others....can't wait for the "is there a worst engine" thread! I've got some for that as well. Have a great weekend all =)
     
  5. rubenova
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    rubenova Junior Member

    ....any John Deere 2 cylinder tractor (Model R is a fav), 3 cylinder Easthope...
     
  6. makobuilders
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Atlanta, USA

    makobuilders Member

    Nice post rubenova, although I don't think Gardners (1200-1500 rpm) are considered low speed (60-300 rpm-ish).

    Anyway, when I worked in India I was smitten by these huge, heavy, industrial pump engines that they employed. I forgot the manufacturer but it's in my archives somewhere. Huge monsters that put out maybe 8-10 hp, started by grabbing the flywheel and spinning it. At full speed you could still count the turns, so perhaps 200 rpm?
     

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  7. jmiele3
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    jmiele3 Junior Member

    Medium speed is coming... but the compliance is the biggest delay. The testing takes time. After the Volkswagen controversy, engine makers are under a lot of scrutiny and the testing times have really increased a lot.
     
  8. makobuilders
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    makobuilders Member

    I just happened upon this older thread and your comment above caught my attention. There are all sorts of conversations about the best engines, the ones that have TBO lives of 15,000 hours or more. But not everyone that owns/builds a boat has a big budget to work from.

    There are many robust engines but with shorter lives of say 6,000 hours or so. If the purchase costs are low, and the parts to overhaul are affordable, then this makes a very practical option.

    Also bear in mind that the average boater, even a die-hard circumnavigator, would be hard pressed to put even 5,000 hours on his engine.
     

  9. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    For budget folks USED is the answer .

    $20,000 new or $3000-5000 as a running take out for an 8000+ engine means low cost.

    Todays engines last very well if maintained.

    A boat build with proper hatches will allow an overnight replacement.

    Many lobster boat folks work with Recyclers and purchase a replacement engine when a sweet deal comes buy.

    For the White Boat fleet at a few hundred hours a year engine replacement may never be needed.
     
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