Is the ocean broken?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by daiquiri, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Last edited: Oct 16, 2020
  2. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Seeding oceans with volcanic ash could be new tool to tackle climate change

    Dumping volcanic ash into the ocean could boost the rate at which carbon is drawn out of the atmosphere and sequestered in marine sediments, researchers from the UK and Germany have proposed. The process, they say, would be simple to implement, requires no changes to land usage – unlike, say, reforestation programmes – and is significantly cheaper than other geoengineering approaches.

    For microscopic marine algae, the deposition of erupted volcanic material, or tephra, can be a nutrient-rich boon.

    The researchers calculate that depositing 50,000 tonnes of tephra – a bulk carrier vessel’s worth – offshore could sequester 2750 tonnes of atmospheric carbon dioxide. This, they said, equates to a cost of around £43 per tonne of carbon dioxide sequestered – ‘an order of magnitude cheaper than many proposed greenhouse gas removal technologies’.

    The research is published in Science Direct.
     
  3. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Or you could just mix the volcanic ash into the concrete from which you build the harbors.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2020
  4. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Here in Northern New England, there are mountains. The White Mountains boast the tallest New England peaks. The AMC (Appalachian Mountain Club) has a promotion program that encourages the use of their amazing an vast trail system. In New Hampshire, it's called the 48 four thousand footers. If you summit, on foot, all 48 peaks on their list, you get your name added to the club and a patch. I've done 28 of them. A few of those peaks are just at the 4000' mark or only a couple of feet above. My concern, if we start dumping more stuff in the oceans, along with the naturally (I mean, otherwise) rising oceans, my 28 peaks may become 27, then 26, 25, 24, etc. All that work and they are no longer 4000' above sea level. I'm fearful that they may decide to re-survey and discover a couple of them are already disqualified. Of course, my first few peaks were the shortest ones, too. So it isn't going to be, that I have only 18 more to go, instead of 20.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2020
  5. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Ships https://what-if.xkcd.com/33/
    [​IMG]
    CUTE.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     
  6. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    I hadn't thought of that. I've climbed the 46 Four-thousanders in the New York Adirondacks. Maybe it's only 45 or 44 now!

    And I think some of the 34 of 54 14-thousand footers in Colorado that I've climbed are also jeopardized. Yikes!

    If this isn't ample grounds for me to become an AGW-denier, I don't know what is.
     
  7. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Wouldn't addition of ash to ocean increase sea level? Yes.
     
  8. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Climate change threatens breeding birds
    Summary:
    Surviving on a warming planet can be a matter of timing -- but simply shifting lifecycle stages to match the tempo of climate change has hidden dangers for some animals, according to new research. The study has uncovered drastic consequences for birds that are breeding earlier in lockstep with earlier starts of spring: chicks hatching earlier face increased risk of poor weather conditions, food shortages and mortality.
     
  9. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Those are ever present risks that we all face all the time.
    The intensity of those risks do vary. It is cyclical.
     
  10. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    20201017_084017.jpg 20201017_084007.jpg
    Woke up this morning to Winter. Only about 2", but 3 more by the time I got out of the shower.

    Maybe Yo's 2030 predictions are here already.

    I am unprepared.

    -Will (Dragonfly)
     

    Attached Files:

  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Winter is 2 months away! That must be global warming variant!
     
  12. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  13. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Climate change has a cow and worm problem

    Cattle and other livestock with worms and other parasites produce more of the super potent greenhouse gas, methane, than healthy animals.

    The amount of methane coming from cattle and other livestock was estimated to grow 20 percent from 2017 to 2050 by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization. But when parasitic worm infections are taken into consideration, the increase in methane could jump as high as 82 percent, according to a new paper published in Trends in Ecology & Evolution.

    Livestock make up 60 percent of all the mammal biomass on Earth, and livestock industries are responsible for more than 14 percent of human-caused greenhouse gas emissions. (For comparison, aviation only accounts for about two percent of global emissions.)
     
  14. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Cows and worms go back many thousands of years, but it wasn't until the worms tried to steal our freedom that they became a problem.
     

  15. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

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