Is the ocean broken?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by daiquiri, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

  2. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    An enormous missing contribution to global warming may have been right under our feet
    • Long before the era of fossil fuels, humans may have triggered a massive but mysterious “carbon bomb” lurking beneath the Earth’s surface
    • Peatlands are only 3 percent of the land surface but store about 30 percent of the global soil carbon
    • The mass conversion of carbon-rich peatlands for agriculture could have added over 250 billion tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere
    • That’s the equivalent of more than seven years of current emissions from the burning of fossil fuels for energy
    • There is a similar concern about the thawing of northern permafrost; in fact, peatlands overlap considerably with permafrost regions.
    The study was published in the journal Science Advances
     
  3. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

  4. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    RedState Bias and Reliability - Ad Fontes Media https://www.adfontesmedia.com/redstate-bias-and-reliability/

    Sorry Yob. Your source just doesn't rate.

    This is a great tool. We don't even need to read an article to find out what it's trying to say, now that we can go somewhere else to find out how reliable and biased the source is.

    I do agree with the article,
    -Will
     
  5. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    The source cited in the article is the Scientific American. It points out the hypocrisy in the Scientific American, a respected publication /a few decades ago..

    So which article do you agree with?

    "unreliable in terms of reliability." is double speak? Sounds stupid.
     
  6. rangebowdrie
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    rangebowdrie Senior Member

    Picking on the Irish are ye,, they've been burning peat forever, probably still do.
     
  7. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    The one I quoted, the one you posted, the one I read even though my cheeky comment suggested I didn't need to.

    However, the name "Redstate" gives a good idea of what they're about. I didn't need a "watchdog" article to tell me. I was just making fun of the whole media world. News media companies exploit people's fears or people's train wreck voyeurism with their sensationalism, and "watchdog" media companies exploit people's laziness, lack of time or their insecurities to sell them a tool that tells them they are being exploited. Now we need to find a consumer reporting organization that tells us which "watchdog" publication can be trusted.

    How Ireland is abandoning its dirty fuel https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20201203-peat-the-decline-of-the-worlds-dirtiest-fuel

    -Will
     
  8. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Sea level rise could have been a factor in Florida building collapse, engineers say - CNN https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn.com/cnn/2021/06/30/us/florida-building-collapse-sea-level-rise/index.html
    upload_2021-7-1_6-57-12.png
    CNN Web is right there on that chart with the Washington Post and the New York times. Is this article typical of their reporting?

    -Will
     
  9. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Scientific American, in spite of its name, was not reporting a scientific study. It mostly quoted statements from a multitude of public authorities, like the Multnomah County health officer, a meteorologist at NWS Seattle, the fire chief of the Pendleton Fire Department, Portland General Electric officials, and even Oregon’s state climatologist. The statements seemed pretty factual to me; not a whole lot to quibble about. Here is what the climatologist said:

    The high temperatures came as the result of a high-pressure system over Oregon and Washington. Climate change played a role in that system, said O’Neill, Oregon’s state climatologist.

    One of the mechanisms for the formation of a high-pressure system is tropical cyclone activity in the western Pacific Ocean, he said. Those are the West Coast equivalent of hurricanes. And like hurricanes, they are strengthened by warmer ocean temperatures.

    High-pressure systems like the one driving the Pacific Northwest heat wave is “something like three times more likely to occur when we have a tropical cyclone out in the Pacific,” he said. “So climate change is impacting tropical cyclone activity through modulation of sea surface temperatures, and also things like wind shear.”

    It seems to me that Redstate is living up to it reputation:
    While I'm not a regular reader of Scientific American, I think it is generally more reliable than Redstate.
     
  10. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Doesn't seem unreasonable to me. Here are more quotes from that article:

    She said, "it's simply foolish" to make investments in infrastructure without considering that we already have a lot of climate change in the pipeline.
    Schafer says that although climate change is already upon us, we have yet to do very much about it.

    "People are still imagining that it will move slow," he said. "The problem is much, much larger, and we need to be thinking much more broadly about how we equitably evacuate ourselves from some areas that won't be available to us here in not so many years."

    As more parts of the world feel the dire impacts of climate change, Schafer says civil engineers such as himself also need to rethink how buildings are designed and how older buildings need to be reassessed to adapt to these changes.

    "I don't think we've owned up even to the scale of the problem," Schafer said. "If you look at the median sea-level rise predictions and project that onto city maps, the scale of what we need to do is so far beyond the scale of what we're so far considering.
     
  11. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Using an imagined cause to a real disaster as proof that
    is unreasonable.
    Reporting on the idea that scientists and engineers are considering the possibility that Climate Change is partly to blame for a collapse building that has already been demonstrated to have had previously identified construction and engineering problems is irresponsible and an appeal to emotion instead of any real proof of anything.

    It isn't necessarily that they said anything unreasonable, it's that they said it that was unreasonable.

    -Will
     
  12. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Against Expectations, Southwestern Summers Are Getting Even Drier
    • The Southwest, already the driest region in the United States, has become even drier since the mid-20th century
    • This runs counter to a basic idea about climate change — that as the world warms from human-caused emissions of greenhouse gases, humidity will increase because warmer air holds more moisture
    • While that may hold globally, the study shows that there can be regions where the opposite is true
    • What we’re seeing in the Southwest on these hot days is that the source of moisture is not the ocean but rather the land surface
    • Lower soil moisture should also cause temperatures to rise, because there is little or no moisture left to evaporate, and evaporation has a cooling effect
    The study was reported in Nature Climate Change
     
  13. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    I have some sympathy for what you are saying, but only a little. Generally speaking, people do not respond prudently to problems that happen very gradually, like Climate Change. People are more apt to respond to here-and-now problems, like the Miami building collapse or the extreme heat in the PNW. I think various officials and journalists, who are concerned about the lack of prudent action regarding Climate Change, are making use of people's natural inclination to respond to immediate threats to also try to elicit their concern for longer-term threats. Using that sort of technique may not be totally honest, but to be fair they are using terms like "may," and "could," and "might." What CNN or Scientific American are saying is far more honest than the denial and obfuscation that news organizations like FOX or Breitbart or the Heartland Institute use.
     
  14. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    "What CNN or Scientific American are saying is far more honest than the denial and obfuscation that news organizations like FOX or Breitbart or the Heartland Institute use."

    In your highly biased opinion those you agree with and you tend to pontificate is truth! How droll!
    My opinion is just as important as yours where the world is concerned, and more important in my humble POV. And I call CNN a liar! That's is not a source you should identify with if you value your credibility.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2021

  15. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    I agree. My opinion is highly biased and mostly useless. That is why I try to present the opinions of subject-matter experts, because they are much more reliable than my own opinion.
     
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