Is the ocean broken?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by daiquiri, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    I assume you're being sarcastic?
     
  2. Dejay
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    Dejay Senior Newbie

    Global reorganization of ocean currents could have 'devastating effects' on climate, experts say
    • The ocean’s eddies are getting stronger.
    • It’s due to climate change, but the research doesn’t specifically call out human activity.
    • Ninety percent of the global heating and 40 percent of carbon dioxide are absorbed by the oceans.
    • The eddies played a “profound role” in moving heat, carbon and nutrients through the ocean and regulating the climate at regional and global scales, the research said.
    Link to study: Global changes in oceanic mesoscale currents over the satellite altimetry record | Nature Climate Change https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-021-01006-9

    Link to other article: Changes to giant ocean eddies could have ‘devastating effects’ globally https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/apr/23/changes-to-giant-ocean-eddies-could-have-devastating-effects-globally

    ---

    I haven't read the study and am not sure what the predicted effect of this would be. It's clear disruption of the AMOC would be devastating. From what I understand slowing circulation and stratification could mean a massive loss of productivity in the ocean.

    I'm hoping strengthening eddies could actually be a negative feedback loop for climate change or an alternative way of mixing the ocean to distribute nutrients. But most likely this will be drastic and rapid change that is not good at all.
     
  3. Dejay
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    Dejay Senior Newbie

  4. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Well, it's pbs(pure bovine scat), so I'm disbelieving.
     
  5. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

  6. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    It could but probably won't.
    Ice shelves are glaciers that already freely flowed onto the ocean.
    Think, Man, think!
     
  7. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    A friendly word of advice:

    If someone has studied a topic that you haven't, and they make a statement that you don't understand, maybe you should try and figure out what they know that you don't know before exposing your ignorance to any and all.

    Quick Facts on Ice Shelves | National Snow and Ice Data Center
    [...]
    Why are ice shelves important?
    Because ice shelves already float in the ocean, they do not contribute directly to sea level rise when they break up. However, ice shelf collapse could contribute to sea level rise indirectly. Ice streams and glaciers constantly push on ice shelves, but the shelves eventually come up against coastal features such as islands and peninsulas, building pressure that slows their movement into the ocean. If an ice shelf collapses, the backpressure disappears. The glaciers that fed into the ice shelf speed up, flowing more quickly out to sea. Glaciers and ice sheets rest on land, so once they flow into the ocean, they contribute to sea level rise.

    Research suggests that glaciers behind ice shelves may accelerate by as much as five times following a rapid ice shelf retreat. To read about a recent study on such glacial acceleration, see the 2004 news release, Antarctic Glaciers Accelerate in Wake of Ice Shelf Breakup.

    What's happening to ice shelves?
    In the last thirty years, scientists have observed a series of unusual ice shelf collapses on the Antarctic Peninsula. Although it is not unusual for ice shelves to calve large icebergs, that process normally takes months to years, as cracks slowly form in the ice. Following a calving, ice shelves generally recover over a period of decades.

    In recent years, ice shelves on the Antarctic Peninsula and along the northern coast of Canada have experienced rapid disintegration. In March 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf in Antarctica retreated by more than 400 square kilometers (160 square miles). Later that summer, several ice shelves along Ellesmere Island in Northern Canada broke up in a matter of days.

    In contrast, the collapses in previous years happened over a period of weeks, leaving a soup of chunky ice and small icebergs. The remaining ice shelves retreated by as much as 90 percent, and several have experienced repeated collapses. For more information on recent collapses, see Wilkins Ice Shelf Breakup Events and Larsen Ice Shelf Breakup Events. To learn more about the current state of ice shelves, see State of the Cryosphere: Ice Shelves.

    [​IMG]
    Antarctica is home to a number of ice shelves.
    The formations are also found along Arctic coastlines.
    Credit: Ted Scambos, NSIDC
    [...]​
     
  8. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    The glaciers slide from the land onto the frigid sea. That is how the ice shelf accumulates. You don't know what I've studied.
    You said a 4° rise in temperature could blah blah blah, not would blah blah blah. Will it or won't it?
    You don't even know if there will be a 4° rise.

    I thank you for offering friendly advice but you can keep it.
     
  9. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Climate change has made rainstorms more erratic, droughts much longer in U.S. West
    • Rainstorms grew more erratic and droughts much longer across most of the U.S. West over the past half-century as climate change warmed the planet
    • The most dramatic changes occurred in the desert Southwest, where the average dry period between rainstorms grew from about 30 days in the 1970s to 45 days between storms now
    • This resulted in more intense and dangerous wildfires, parched croplands and not enough vegetation to support livestock and wildlife
    • “Once the growing season starts, the total amount of rainfall is important. But if it comes in just a few large storms, with really long dry periods in between, that can have really detrimental consequences”
    The new findings were published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters
     
  10. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Melting glaciers have been shifting the Earth’s poles since 1995, new study suggests
    • Because the Earth is not rigid and changes in the distribution of its mass, the position of the poles can change in a phenomenon called polar drift or true polar wander
    • Scientists have measured a slow shift in the poles associated with the rebound of parts of the Earth that were once covered by glaciers
    • Now they've showed that a faster eastward drift of the poles that began in 2005 is linked to melting glaciers and the associated sea-level rise
    • There is also a contribution from the extraction of groundwater at middle latitudes – in places like California, Texas, the region around Beijing and northern India
    • The average speed of the eastward drift of the poles in 1995–2020 is about 3 mm/year – which is about 17 times faster than the average speed observed in 1981–1995
    The study is described in Geophysical Research Letters
     
  11. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Not that I'm debating the study, but how do you go East from the poles?

    -Will
     
  12. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    If the true (north) pole is no longer at the geographical (north) pole, then the true (north) pole is necessarily south of the geographical (north) pole, and any movement it may have can be described as moving in a north, east, south, or west direction.

    True polar wander
     
  13. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    A house at the north pole will have all southern views from every window.
     
  14. Dejay
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    Dejay Senior Newbie

    The 'heat bombs' destroying Arctic sea ice
    • a new study shows how plumes of warm water are flowing into the Arctic Ocean from the Pacific Ocean and accelerating sea ice melt from below.
    • The Arctic is an unusual ocean in that it is stratified—or layered—by salinity instead of temperature. Most oceans of the world have warmer, lighter water near the surface and colder, denser water below. In the Arctic, however, there is a surface layer that is cold but very fresh, influenced by river outflow and accelerating ice melt.
    • Warm, relatively salty water enters from the Pacific Ocean through the Bering Strait and then the Barrow Canyon off Alaska's northern coast, which acts as a nozzle as the water flows through the narrow passage.
    • Because this water is saltier than the Arctic surface water, it is dense enough to "subduct," or dive beneath, the fresh Arctic surface layer. Its movement creates pockets of very warm water that lurk below surface waters. Scientists have been seeing these pockets of warm sub-surface water strengthen over the last decade.
    ---

    Another entry in the "faster than predicted" category. I don't see how they can be so optimistic in saying arctic sea ice "could" disappear. If you look at the graphs we'll have blue ocean event in like 5 years.

    I wonder if this could also play a role in the increasing release of methane of the arctic clathrates.

    They also seem to have done some interesting engineering work for the measurement devices.

    [​IMG]
     

  15. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    The north magnetic pole is somewhat south of the north celestial pole and can shift east relative to its current position.
     
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