Is the ocean broken?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by daiquiri, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. hoytedow
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    hoytedow wood butcher

    Ad hominem attack is a sign you can't argue the case.
    Hey, it's not all bad news. At least there will be more jobs for gravediggers, if they can hack their way through the frozen earth without power equipment.
     
  2. hoytedow
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    hoytedow wood butcher

    I hope your battery powered ambulance can get you to the battery powered hospital to treat your frostbite from your battery powered house heater.
     
  3. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Frozen wind turbines are one culprit in Texas’s power outages
    While ice has forced some turbines to shut down just as a brutal cold wave drives record electricity demand, wind only comprises 25% of the state’s energy mix this time of year. The majority of outages overnight were plants fueled by natural gas, coal and nuclear, which together make up more than two-thirds of power generation during winter....

    He estimates that about 27 gigawatts of coal, nuclear and gas capacity is unavailable, in part because the cold has driven up demand for natural gas for heating. “That’s the bigger problem.”...

    “The performance of wind and solar is way down the list among the smaller factors in the disaster that we’re facing,” Daniel Cohan, associate professor of environmental engineering at Rice University, said in an interview. Blaming renewables for the blackouts “is really a red herring.”​

     
  4. hoytedow
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    hoytedow wood butcher

    So laugh. I'll wait my turn.
     
  5. hoytedow
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    hoytedow wood butcher

    Last edited: Feb 17, 2021
  6. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    I don't find XINOs all that funny.
     
  7. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    It would be good to recycle windmill blades, but AFAIK they're not toxic. They take up far less room than all the old tires. Not a major problem, I would say.
     
  8. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    The Environmental Threat You’ve Never Heard Of
    • Coastal waters around the world are steadily growing darker due to a change in the color and clarity of the water
    • The changes in the physics will lead to biological changes
    • The darkening can be caused by fertilizer enters the water and causes an algal bloom, or boats stir up light-blocking silt as they move, or heavy rains eroding material from decaying plants and loose soil
    • This process is well documented in rivers and lakes, but has largely been overlooked in coastal areas
    • Experiments have shown that darkening reduces phytoplankton growth, and changed proportions of species
    • Darkening may have already caused up to a three-week delay in the usual “bloom” of phytoplankton in the North Sea
    • Decreased light could benefit creatures that don’t rely on sight to hunt such as jellyfish, and hinder species such as fish that hunt using eyesight
    • Sunlight breaks down some toxic chemicals, including methyl mercury,and if light is less able to penetrate the water, methyl mercury sticks around longer
    • Environmental regulations around fertilizer use have resulted in improvements in the North Sea, parts of North America, and the Mediterranean Sea
    [​IMG]
     
  9. hoytedow
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    hoytedow wood butcher

    Thanks for the reminder. I have to go after fertilizer.
    The free stuff is the best. Straight from the horse.(whinny).
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2021
  10. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Climate Change Is Causing Sea Levels to Rise Faster than Most Forecasts
    • Climate change is causing oceans to rise quicker than scientists’ most pessimistic forecasts
    • Half-meter of sea rise by the end of the century can now be expected with just a 0.5 degree Celsius rise in temperatures
    • Oceans could rise more than 1 meter at 2 degrees Celsius, a trajectory that will be easily passed under current climate policies
    • Economies need to cut an additional 200 billion metric tons of carbon — equivalent to about five years of global emissions — to remain within the thresholds set by previous forecasts

    [​IMG]

    The revised estimates are published in Ocean Science
     
  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow wood butcher

    Hogwash.
     
  12. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

     
  13. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Climate change "may have played a key role" in coronavirus pandemic, study says
    • Changes in climate have transformed the forests of Southeast Asia, resulting in an explosion of bat species in the region
    • An additional 40 species of bat have moved into the region, carrying with them 100 more types of bat-borne coronaviruses
    • These findings have scientists concerned about the probability that climate change will make future pandemics more likely
    • "What the study apparently gets wrong is the assumption that the increased diversity of bats (which they postulate) leads to an increased risk of a bat-borne virus jumping to humans....The vast majority of bats are harmless to humans — they don't harbor viruses that can make us sick."
    • However, ecosystem changes are shifting the habitat of many species, putting more species in contact with one another, potentially allowing viruses to spread more easily
    The study was published in Science of The Total Environment

    See also:
    Scientists sceptical of new bat study linking climate change to Covid-19 emergence
     
  14. hoytedow
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    hoytedow wood butcher

    Hogwash is hogwash. Never argue with hogwash. Just say,"Hey, everybody, there's a bucket of hogwash!"
    Arguing with hogwash is like arguing with a doorknob and just as rewarding.
     

  15. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Global Ice Loss on Pace to Drive Worst-Case Sea Level Rise
    and
    Studies Reveal Global Ice Melt Estimates Have Been Conservative
    • Observations from satellites, on-the-ground measurements, and model-based estimates show ice loss and sea level rise falling in the upper range of scenarios by IPCC
    • At least 74 Greenland glaciers are strongly retreating due to warmer ocean waters melt them from below, making it more easy for pieces to break and fall off
    • Increased mountain ice melt has significant implications for communities which rely on glaciers as sources of fresh drinking water and water for irrigation
    • Sea level has gone up about eight or nine inches since 1880. It’s likely to rise at least 12 inches, and could rise by as much as 8.2 feet by 2100, per NOAA
    • IPCC estimates a rise of between two and three feet by 2100 if global warming is kept well below two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), or three to five feet if temperatures rise past that.
    • Various studies show an acceleration in sea level rise the last five years or so, from about 1.2 inches per decade, to a rate of 1.9 inches per decade
    • “The only real option is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions ASAP. The re-entry of the U.S. in the Paris climate agreement is a hopeful sign.”
    One study was published in Cryosphere
    Another study was published in Science Advances
     
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