Is my hull shape decent?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by stonedpirate, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. Collin
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Collin Senior Member

    Use a rounded praam shape instead. You'll gain a lot of interior space. Instead of going skinny and deep, why not go for a wider boat? Since you're going to extremes already, why not make it 6.5' wide?
     
  2. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Stumble Senior Member

    I guess I can't get my head wrapped around why anyone would want to build a 10' long distance cruiser. Perhaps for a record run, or something, but then there should be sponsors involved to fund the project. It would be cheaper, easier, faster, more comfortable, and be much more seaworthy to go up in size to at least 20'.
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A boat on that size will lose stability with a crew exercising on deck.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This poster has been on a quest for some sort of claustrophobic record attempt for some time. I'm very confident he's never been at sea in anything very small, nor understands the perils or difficulties, but he seems determined to find a way to excise himself from the gene pool. I tried to help some time back, but now refuse to be party to what appears a hormone induced, need to see if he can find a way, to get himself drowned.
     
  5. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    No one mention "Around in Ten" either, that's just encouraging our friend!
     
  6. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    If you want to get beat up anyway wouldn't an egg shape be better.
     
  7. stonedpirate
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: Australia

    stonedpirate Senior Member

    Havent you seen karate kid? Its all about balance :p

    Spent the enitre winter living on an 18 foot yacht. A red jacket.

    Taught myself to sail.

    Took it out in conditions way beyond its abilities.

    I get what i'm in for.

    I stand up on my kayak casting throw nets.

    Havent fallen off yet :p

    Having a harness system will keep me on board
     
  8. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Deeds not words;) Show us a video of your boat in rough weather so we can entertain ourselves.
     
  9. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Michigan, USA

    sharpii2 Senior Member

    I like the 2nd design more than the 1st.

    The 1st design had such deep sections that it would have little initial stability. The sail carrying ability would have to come almost entirely from ballast. These little boats end up heavy enough as it is, in order to carry sufficient stores for anything that can count as an off shore voyage. Your newer design seems to be a better compromise.

    Sven Yervin has done an impressive amount of work with very small voyaging boats, as has his disciple Leyden. Sven has done off shore voyages in boats as small as 15 ft. Matt has done long coastal voyages in a series of small boats, under 15 ft, including his now famous PARADOX.

    Have you calculated the displacement, ballast, and sail area yet?

    Just for everyone's amusement, I will show a concept I drew when i was hanging out at the aroundinten web site.

    A few characteristics might prove interesting.

    The rig was intentionally designed with a severe lee helm with the jib up. This was to make it sail downwind reliably (its primary course) without a vane or auto pilot. To sail up wind or across , the jib was to be struck.

    The boat is both over weight and under rigged. The rig is designed for simplicity, easy replace ability, and ultimate strength.

    For lighter air sailing, light extensions were to be added to the boom and gaff, and a sail extension, I call a 'guppy tail', would be set between them. The bowsprit could also have an extension added, from which a lighter outer jib would fly.

    The boat would embark displacing around 1,700 lbs. On arrival. it may end up displacing half as much. The difference would be fresh water and canned goods.

    The interior (not shown) would have numerous storage compartments which would be under and on both sides of the skipper. The side ones would be divided up into three levels.

    The heaviest stores would go under the skipper (the heaviest single object in the boat) and the rest would be stored on the three shelves, ranked from heaviest to lightest. Each compartment would have its own small hatch, which would be firmly secured.

    By this means, I hoped to use the stores themselves as part of the ballast system.

    The keel would weigh not much more than two hundred pounds. Its primary function, other than providing lateral area and roll dampening, would be to right the boat in the likely event of a wave induced capsize.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    I am just thinking of the last time I crossed the Gulf of Mexico on a 30' sailboat and got caught out in rough weather, not dangerous for the boat, but 25-35kn winds and 15' seas. Two days like that was miserable, and I have a few thousand sea miles. The idea of spending more only for a small boat in those conditions is just crazy to me.

    Stoned, unless you have experienced real rough conditions for days on end, you have no idea how bad it can be. And just saying, well I'm tough so I can handle it, grossly under estimates how miserable it can be.
     
  11. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
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    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    Perhaps something like this?
    Hardly what I'd call luxury... hardly what I'd call a boat, for that matter!!:p
     

    Attached Files:

  12. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I got rolled over on a 25 footer in the Southern Caribbean about two years ago.
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Sail around the world in it, and I guarantee, if you make it, you'll still be rocking six months after you get off it on to dry land. :D
     
  14. TrustedShips
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Location: India

    TrustedShips Mr.

    Since you have made up your mind to sail in a boat of that size, around the world, i am worried about you. I do not know if you are fond of TV, but here are some links which can highlight the dangers involved:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven_Callahan#76_Days_At_Sea

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Shouldn't_Be_Alive

    Pls see:

    (1) "Shark Survivor"
    (2) "Swept Away"
    (3) "Shipwrecked"
    (4) "Lost at Sea"
    (5) "Blood in the Water"
    (6) "Dive Into Danger"
    (7) "Boys Adrift"
    (8) "Fear in Freefall"
    (9) "Shipwrecked Family"
    (10) "Death in the Sea of Cortez"
    (11) "76 Days Adrift"
    (12) "River of Fear"
    (13) "Ocean Disaster"
    (14) "Dive of Terror"

    Off course, this is not adding to your 'fun', but these are the things that you must consider before starting to design a thing like that. You are talking about swimming when weather permits. I personally don't have the kind of sea experience that can guide you. But having watched all these shows, I can say that when out at the sea, you must never go away from the only thing that keeps you afloat at sea. You never know when things turn against you.

    Secondly, not just your visibility of the surroundings, but the visibility of your boat to other people is also important. This is an important thing for survival at sea. When you are in trouble, you should be visible to others.

    Thirdly, what is your back up for survival. Life saving, fire fighting. Probably you'll have to carry a small life raft. Also some rocket signals.

    Next, you intend to store you stores in a low position. Suppose your hull gets banged by a rock in a severe storm and water leaks in, all your stores will become unusable. So protection of everything that you need to survive at sea is very vital.

    Being brave is one thing and being foolish is another.
     

  15. TrustedShips
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Location: India

    TrustedShips Mr.

    :D

    cant stop laughing
     
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