Is my hull shape decent?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by stonedpirate, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. stonedpirate
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 384
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 23
    Location: Australia

    stonedpirate Senior Member

    Hi all,

    Finally figured out how to use 3d software.

    I plant to build a 10 foot luxury yacht capable of handling the open ocean for short coastal cruises.

    I am going to fit it out with the best wood, rigging, paint etc etc. As it is only 10 foot long, the idea is to incorporate everything you love about yachting if you had the cash. At 10 foot, it will be like a mini dream boat :p

    Anywho, are there any immediate flaws to my hull designs? I mean, looking at the pics below, what would your critisim be?

    I am not aiming for perfomance, just something that floats, is indestructable. At 10 foot its hull speed is only like 3 knots or something.

    Any critiques would be appreciated. I used a checker pattern to make the curves more visible.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I plan to cold mold it.

    Originally i was interested in setting the worlds smallest boat circumnavigation, but realsied what a long shot that was.

    Half the fun for me is designing, building and testing these boats and want a mini luxury yacht just incase anyone was wondering why someone would build such a small boat.

    Thanks
     
  2. stonedpirate
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 384
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 23
    Location: Australia

    stonedpirate Senior Member

    10 foot loa
    beam 5 foot
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,276
    Likes: 584, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    To start with, the color squares mask the shape. I think that there is so much wrong with it that it is hard to explain. A yacht is a luxury vessel, and their tenders can carry a bigger boat than that as a lifeboat. A 2:1 beam to length ratio, with a deep draft makes the boat perform horribly. I suppose it may float.
     
  4. stonedpirate
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 384
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 23
    Location: Australia

    stonedpirate Senior Member

    thanks gonzo

    I am trying to build a miniature old style bluewater cruiser.

    I dont like the modern boats with fin keels, thin beam etc etc. They just dont look hefty enough for the sea. They obviously perfom a lot better, but in a 10 footer, i am not going to outrun any storms so need an indestructable tub that can travel 3knots. As for its fatness, i am aiming for maximum storage capacity.

    Without the squares, you cant see any curves.
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,276
    Likes: 584, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Modern boats don't have thin beams. The feature many of us criticize is the tendency to exaggerated beam in modern boats. Old style bluewater cruisers, say early 20th century vintage, are quite narrow. Miniature and old style blue water cruiser are mutually exclusive. The common way of showing a design is with a grid. The best is to show the standard three views of side, plan and elevation. Buttocks and diagonals help a lot to see the curves. There is a tendency to create fancy colorful drawings with computers, but they are not as helpful to study or build a boat.
     
  6. stonedpirate
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 384
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 23
    Location: Australia

    stonedpirate Senior Member

    oh, and thought i should mention, there is no cockpit, will be sailed from inside.

    flush deck except for dome window up top
     
  7. stonedpirate
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 384
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 23
    Location: Australia

    stonedpirate Senior Member

    Oh, i see. I will work on my presentation :)

    I realize that, but this is just a hobby.

    I want an old beefy bluewater cruiser with wide beam, full keel etc etc scaled down to 10 foot.

    I will see if i can find a pic.
     
  8. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,276
    Likes: 584, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Nothing is indestructible. Sailing from the inside may work on cold climates. If you live in high latitude it can be possible to stay inside and not suffocate. However, your horizon will be very limited and you will have visibility problems. Then you also will have all the lines coming under deck with all the leaks associated with it. Honestly, it doesn't seem like a good idea.
     
  9. stonedpirate
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 384
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 23
    Location: Australia

    stonedpirate Senior Member

    I have taken all these things into consideration and have come up with unique solutions.

    Basically, all these problems were faced by serge testa when he sailed around the world in a 12 foot boat.

    He suffered extreme heat and humidity, skin rashes, etc etc.

    I have developed a good ventilation system with constant flowing air and a hammock to keep me off the floor.

    Its like living inside a coffin.

    Great for sleeping, but in good weather i can open the hatch.

    My seat would be just like sitting in a cockpit.

    In bad weather, i am stuck indoors.

    Dont know how visibility is a problem?

    360 views from my dome
     
  10. Leo Lazauskas
    Joined: Jan 2002
    Posts: 2,696
    Likes: 146, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2229
    Location: Adelaide, South Australia

    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    I regard naval architecture a blend of art and science.
    Your project is a little beyond the art end of that spectrum.
    It deserves a full analysis using CFD, the vajazzle of hydrodynamics.
     
  11. stonedpirate
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 384
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 23
    Location: Australia

    stonedpirate Senior Member

    Thanks Leo.

    Looks complicated.

    Was planning on just building a scale model with remote control rudder and testing in the river and on the beach in scale waves.
     
  12. DavidJ
    Joined: Jun 2004
    Posts: 222
    Likes: 31, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 441
    Location: Canada

    DavidJ Senior Member

    This is hilarious. I love it.
     
  13. stonedpirate
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 384
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 23
    Location: Australia

    stonedpirate Senior Member

    :)

    Think model boat that you can actually use.
     
  14. bhnautika
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 839
    Likes: 53, Points: 38, Legacy Rep: 571
    Location: australia

    bhnautika Senior Member


  15. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
    Posts: 5,372
    Likes: 246, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 3380
    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Anything goes, so I guess this one will go too. ;)
    I suggest you to type "micro sailboat" in google image search, you'll get a plenty of inspirational designs and pics to study and admire.

    What software did you use for the hull modeling? If it cannot show lines plan or create the table of offsets, how do you intend to transform it to executive drawings?

    Cheers
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.