Is it possible to combine a sailboat, motorboat and submarine?

Discussion in 'Motorsailers' started by tahroo, Sep 14, 2012.

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  1. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Sounds odd to have only 1 bulkhead
     
  2. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

    How about the structural integrity of a round shape cross section hull?
    A tube or pipe shape hull would require bulkheads for integrity,
    or it could be without bulkhead?
    I would guess, water dept no deeper than 33 ft (10m).
     
  3. Jamie Kennedy
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    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    I think the British call it a sail. Not sure.
     
  4. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    33feet???

    Grow up. WW2 subs went greater than 300ft.

    The best shape for water pressure is a tube with a circular crossection. Bulkheads will increase the pressure capability and multiples help control the amount of water taken on in the event of a leak.
    We were told that on SSBN 610 (that class) that any compartment could be completely filled and the boat still make it to the surface (if you did everything right) except the Engine room.

    No idea what modern subs have for bulkheads, but basic design principles generally don't change.
     
  5. exp30002

    exp30002 Previous Member

    Grow Up. Do you talk the same way to you mother also?
     
  6. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    In artichokes diagram i count 8 spaces which i assume are separated by watertight bulk heads.
     
  7. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    My mother is dead, what are you trying to say?

    What I am saying is that the most trivial of investigation would have shown that was the most silly thing I have seen in a long time.

    The depth capability of a 70's sub was claimed to be 2000 feet (at the keel) and that was not the classified number.
    The diameter of the hull was ~30 feet and the conning tower (sail or whatever you want to call it) was 20 feet. The top of the sail would not even be wet at 33 feet.
     
  8. lance linked
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    lance linked Junior Member

    Last year I had a courtesy tour of the front end of a Los Angeles class boat at the New London CT Sub Base where my son is stationed as a 2nd Petty ET Nav. I did not go into the Engineering section, but saw all of the Operations section. There is one major bulkhead between the Eng and Ops sections, with minor separations between the Operations deck and Fire Control actions area, IIRC. The flooring between decks is bar grating. This construction detail is included in Tom Clancy's book on modern submarines:
    http://www.amazon.com/Submarine-Tom-Clancys-Military-Reference/dp/0425190013

    This book was done at the behest of the US Navy as a PR piece in 2003. The book includes more detail than you would expect for a published work. I have heard (my brother knew TC at the time and lived in the same building in Baltimore harbor) that the Navy suggested Clancy co-author the work in effort to increase public support for naval construction programs, that can seem expensive, until you see what your tax dollars are really buying.

    In any case, there are many watertight doors, such as those used in the escape trunks, but there is really only one "bulkhead" in the boat.

    The Los Angeles boats were built in 4 tubular segments, with nearly all systems installed before the segments were joined and end capped. As a welding engineer I understand the particulars of the joining and the structural issues involved. The different series of Los Angeles boats had slightly different structural designs, which lent to specific strengths and weaknesses that we shouldn't be discussing here. Suffice to say, they go faster than 2 miles an hour and can submerge deeper than 20 feet. Nothing more can be said between persons without appropriate level security clearances.

    My hat is off to the men if the US Sub Service. They are truly the cream of the crop, an elite, all volunteer, competitively selected service that consists of America's best and brightest, strongest, and most brave. To those of you out there that wear the dolphins, I thank you for your service, and thank you for taking my son in as a brother in arms.
     
  9. Anthony Appleyard
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    Anthony Appleyard Anthony Appleyard

  10. deck work shop
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    deck work shop Junior Member

    Dear
    there are some limitations in designing submersible devices according to the water pressure . positive buoyancy submersibles need more speed for producing enough downward force . personalty i prefer some separable weight for safety instead of positive buoyancy that will make it possible to hovering under water.however your concept is not impossible .
     

  11. Anthony Appleyard
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    Anthony Appleyard Anthony Appleyard

    Try a lighter-than-water sub with 4 big-enough side hydroplanes (or 4 very short airplane-type wings with their aerofoils upside-down) (one each side each end)? Then, if the sub keeps moving, it will stay down against buoyancy.

    That drug cartel sub shown several message above :: likely its crew will sometimes be inhaling something less welcome to them than their drug, judging by the size of that exhaust pipe and the amount of fumes it is emitting.
     
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