Is finding docks for cats really a problem ?

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Mark Peiffer, Dec 2, 2004.

  1. Mark Peiffer
    Joined: Sep 2003
    Posts: 14
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Colorado

    Mark Peiffer Boat dreamer

    Please give me feedback if you have a cat and have found dock space a problem. I have never tried, but I see a lot of cats, so I wonder is this a myth or should I rethink buying a 20 foot wide boat.

    Please help out with your responses - Thanks
     
  2. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 109, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Cruising,
    many docks particularly on the East coast ICW are very long and everyone goes along side.
    The operators skills level are so low that huge long hoses are used to refule , rather than have the boat actually move.

    For storage 20 ft of beam is very expensive as the dock will be built for an 80 or 100 ft boat and in many places you pay by the SLIP , not LOA.

    In some places in California you pay by the SQ foot (not LOA) , again not cheap for a big wide boat.

    The usual multihull route is the end of the dock , but thats PREMIUM space (no neighbors on one side and a View!) . So there can be years of waiting , a premium to be paid , and the end can be very ROUGH .
    Requiring a Breast anchor to hold the thin skinned light weight boat from smashing thru on the dock.

    Best for any multihull is the mooring.

    My experience with a 45ft Tri from 1965 to 1973 living aboard in NYC area.

    Hard to heat in winter too,(mucho surface area).

    FAST FRED
     
  3. Mark Peiffer
    Joined: Sep 2003
    Posts: 14
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Colorado

    Mark Peiffer Boat dreamer

    Thanks Fred - sounds like you were able to make it work. I have seen plenty of examples of what you stated. I wopuld think ports of call that I visit would pose the gratest problem and morring would be the way to go there. Sound like it's just another myth from mono hullers.

    I hope others share their observations - especially mono hull owners
    I really appreciate the reply,
    Mark
     
  4. tspeer
    Joined: Feb 2002
    Posts: 2,202
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1673
    Location: Port Gamble, Washington, USA

    tspeer Senior Member

    One thing to think about is transient moorage as well as permanent moorage. I sail a Corsair F-24 trimaran, and on more than one occaison the abilty to fold on the water and fit into a conventional slip has made the difference between spending the night at the dock or anchoring out.
     

  5. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 109, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    In crowded harbors your best advantage is to head for the shallows.

    Frequently there is loads of room with about 2 -3 ft of water.

    If she is strong enough to take the ground regularly , that 2 -3 ft is only needed at high tide ,
    but be sure to anchor with enough water to operate your dink at LOW tide , or you will be marooned!

    Watch the rocks,

    FAST FRED
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.