Introduction, Questions about Restoration, etc

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by BA.Barcolounger, Oct 16, 2007.

  1. BA.Barcolounger
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 3
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    Location: Albany NY

    BA.Barcolounger New Member

    I'm new here. And new to boat restoration. I've done restoration work before, but mostly on furniture and musical instruments, very small scale compared to boats. I've been interested in wooden boats for a while, and the wife finally gave me the OK.

    I have been given the opportunity to acquire a very old boat. A guy I know bought a house and the boat was left there by the previous owner. He has no interest. I am going over there later in the week for a closer look. He sent me some pictures. They are attached.

    From some cursory internet research, I think it is a 50's era Lyman or Thompson. I figured I should ask some people who would know what they were talking about.

    What do you think it is?
    Do you think it's restorable?


    -Mike
     

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  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    All things are restorable, but the questions are many, such as is it worth it, can I do it, are the things that I can't do in reasonable enough condition to warrant doing the things I can do, etc.

    I've restored and repaired no small number of this type of craft and they're one of the most difficult to do well. I see hull distortions and numerous other issues, most of which are past the novice backyard repair person's abilities.

    I'd skip this (which appears to be a Lyman) and find one that is in a more reasonable condition. Lapstake construction wouldn't be my first choice for cutting your teeth on in boat restoration. Try carvel, batten seam or ply on frame for your first attempts.
     
  3. hansp77
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Melbourne Australia

    hansp77

    Welcome Mike,
    you got some good advice from PAR- who knows his stuff,
    so don't mind me:)

    If the wife has just let you, make sure you don't bite off more than you can chew- or it may be the last time:rolleyes:
    Also, I would really try to figure out what boat you want first, and then look for it- or something like it (based on how and where you want to use it, with how many people, and what use etc... if you want help with that, ask the good members here), rather than coming across a boat and seeing if you like it enough... if you've got the bug, especially at these early stages, then it is too easy to convince yourself that the boat will be what you want... too easy to fall in love. So I would start by describing your wants/needs in a boat, then looking for what is going to fullfill them- rather than attempting to reverse engineer this boat or futuer onces you come across into suiting your situation.
    Don't worry, by all appearances you are in the land of milk and honey as far as 'opportunities to aquire old wooden boats' goes, there will be lots of options and opportunities available to you.

    Good luck and whatever you do let us know how it goes.

    Hans.
     
  4. BA.Barcolounger
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Albany NY

    BA.Barcolounger New Member

    Thanks for the advice.

    I'm going over tomorrow after work to get a closer look. He says the hull is solid, but I'm going to bring a long screwdriver and do alot of poking around for soft spots, before I make a final decision. For a free boat, I figure I'd be a fool to not consider it.

    I gave it some thought before I even broached the subject with the wife. It is this type of boat that I came up with. I am not really looking to restore it to "showroom" condition, rather to a workable, usable, decent condition (especially for my first venture into boat restoration). I looked at other boats for sale around the area (upstate NY), and found alot of really nice boats (ChrisCrafts and Century's mostly), but they were very expensive. Plus, I like the "Lyman" shape.

    I'll bring my camera.
     
  5. Kaptin-Jer
    Joined: Mar 2004
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    Location: South Florida

    Kaptin-Jer Semi-Pro

    Par warned you! Before you make that step into Our Insane World jump over to the Fiberglass forum and read the thread "open letter".
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    B.A. I'd strongly recommend you bring along a boat carpenter, one familiar with lapped hulls, not the local outboard mechanic who thinks he knows.

    Lyman's are clench built and if constructed before 1966, will have nothing in the seams, except perfectly fitted laps. "Getting out" a well fitting lapstrake plank is serious effort for the professional and frankly not something I would recommend for even a well skilled novice. Just removing the plank with little damage can be quite challenging (so it can be used as a pattern for a replacement).

    The other consideration is the shape of the hull which is clearly distorted. Steam bent frames have a nasty tendency of "opening up" as they age. This causes them to apply outward and downward pressure on the sheer clamp, stringers and the bilge turn to sag down. It's very difficult and exacting work to restore a tired hull back to something close to its original shape and well beyond the novices abilities. Without this shape restoration, you'll replace pieces into a hogged/hooked hull that will perform poorly.

    Last year, WoodenBoat magazine had a good feature on how this shape restoration is performed.
     
  7. BA.Barcolounger
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Albany NY

    BA.Barcolounger New Member

    Well there was no need for the camera. As soon as I pulled in the driveway, I had my answer. Nope.

    There were several issues that jumped out at me. First, I don't know what kind of tape measure the guy used but it was way longer than 18', more like 26'. Too big for my needs. Secondly, he had it up on blocks, but only at the bow and stern, none anywhere else, so there was considerable "sag" in the bottom.

    Oh well. I'll keep looking.
     
  8. Kaptin-Jer
    Joined: Mar 2004
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    Location: South Florida

    Kaptin-Jer Semi-Pro

    If you really want to have a boat and also want to do a little work try your hand at a kit. There are some great kits on the market that are self teaching. For example, look at the thread w/ posted pictures of "First New Build" Just a thought---. It's a great way to learn your way around boats.
     
  9. longliner45
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Ohio

    longliner45 Senior Member

    as par said ,,it appears to be a lyman ,,snatch it up ,,go to the great lakes and get a good one ,,use this one for parts,,longliner
     
  10. eponodyne
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Upper Midwest

    eponodyne Senior Member

    I restored and sold a 23' Lyman Islander a few years ago, but it was in considerably better shape than this one was to start with. ANd I certainly didn't try to restore it to 'factory original' but only to get it watertight and seaworthy. It was a HUGE pain in the stern.
     
  11. longliner45
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Ohio

    longliner45 Senior Member

    even if you dont want it ,,the original gauges and stuff is worth alot to someone restoring one,,longliner
     

  12. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    That looks to be an Islander, maybe early 1960's. Usually the gauges are history when left to the elements, though some of the gear may be of some value if re-plated or otherwise restored. These parts would only be advantageous if you found another early 60's Islander. Things like struts, shafts, rudder, transom brackets, cleats, the big bronze ring on the foredeck hatch and other parts can be hard to find, if you need them, nearly imposable to sell if you don't. There are a lot of Lyman's around, many needing some TLC others full restoration, but they're all over the great lakes, the 1,000 island chain and through the Ohio valley area.
     
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