interesting new core material

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Gasdok, Nov 15, 2020.

  1. Gasdok
    Joined: May 2020
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    Gasdok Junior Member

    NANOCORE by thge Farside Global group looks really promising.
    apparently its a corrugaed tube system inside composite skins using a proprietary nanomaterial and is so strong it allows reduction of skin thicknesses by 90 percent w equivalent cost savings.
    rybo runner has built a 36yt x 10 ft catamaran using this that weighs in at 1200 lbs dry.

    this sounds really like it will revolutionizse the industry.
     
  2. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

  3. clmanges
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    clmanges Senior Member

    Link, please.
     
  4. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    That Nanocore is able to reduce skin thickness by 90% is a fairy tale. Marketing claims like that really ought to be classified as felonies.

    Stiffness or bending strength of a member is a function of the cube of the thickness. That means that the Nanocore material will have to have something like one thousand times the tensile strength of whatever material it is being compared to.

    Now let us get to the realities. It is entirely possible that we can develop materials that exhibit very impressive elastic modulus figures. Carbon fibers are a case in point. However these advances in materials are not nearly as sensational as the Nanocore claim.
     
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  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Sounds like the aerospace industry would go ape over such a thing, if as good at the OP advertises, I think it might have been Jehardiman who was speaking about the limitations of carbon nanotubes recently, he might be able to comment.
     
  6. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    90% skin reduction sounds awesome.
    Take solid FRP
    Two skins at 90% on either side of a core 200 times as thick as original FRP.
    Might be similar stiffness
    ZERO to NO puncture resistance.
     
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  7. fastsailing
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    fastsailing Junior Member

    Source for your info is ?
    This link: TECHNOLOGY | NanoCore https://www.nanocore.com/technology/
    does not support your claims.
    It doesn't indicate anything at all about core being used. The name of the company does not mean the product has something to do with core.
    The actual content of said link does not even indicate skins made of nanotube composite could replace carbon fiber skins for cored panels, while skin thickness is reduced by 90%.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2020
  8. fastsailing
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    fastsailing Junior Member

    If said claims are false and made by a company for marketing, when I would agree, otherwise not.
    It should be pointed out there is no such claim in the link provided.
    There is only this:
    First, it compares only ideal properties, not those find in practice.
    Second, it compares specific strength, which means the material with lower density can be weaker than that would otherwise suggest. It is reasonable to assume hollow CNT has a lower density than carbon fiber does.

    Stiffness for a homogenous material in bending is a function of the cube of the thickness.
    Strength for a homogenous material in bending is a function of the square of the thickness.
    Neither is true for a sandwich panel in bending like a beam. Neither is true for bending of plate in 2 dimensions at the same time, even for homogenous material, like most steel.

    Not correct.
     
  9. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I say much ado until they show something concrete.

    Hey! Concrete has good puncture resistance!
     
  10. fastsailing
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    fastsailing Junior Member

    Based on what?
    20 times strength for the same weight and 20 times elongation longitudinally before tensile strength is reached for the same stiffness, combines on 400 times energy absorption per weight. But that is only in longitudinal direction. As the name implies nanotubes are tubes, meaning they can also absorb energy by changing their cross-sectional shape.
    So perhaps it might mean it will be capable of absorbing 600 times as much impact energy over all for the same weigh. For 10% of original weight, it would still be 60 times more energy. That does not indicate less puncture resistance, just the opposite. There will however be a lot of damage to any conventional core long before the skin made of ideal CNT composite will be punctured.
    None of that obviously proves anything about any real world product. But an assumption of less puncture resistance is clearly baseless.
     

  11. kach22i
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    kach22i Architect

    27 August 2020
    Plastic Fantastic - ATV-SEMAPP/ Teknologisk videndeling https://atv-semapp.dk/plastic-fantastic/
    Clearly it's just a puff of smoke.

    Sounds like vapor depositing on sensors to me.
     
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