Interesting folding kayak

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Corley, Feb 2, 2013.

  1. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

  2. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Old Woodbutcher

    That is cool.
     
  3. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    I love it for no better reason than it actually ends up having some sweet lines (what collapsable boat looks that "normal" after all?). Whether the creases slow it down much, I don't know, but it probably isn't too bad. And the fact that it can fit into an apartment or maybe be carried somehow on a bicycle is a huge selling point.
     
  4. kvsgkvng
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    kvsgkvng Senior Member

    I see some problems with the material and seams. The plastic will disintegrate after short period of time. I also see problem with seam joint. Complete longitudinal seam will have leaks because the boat must withstand lots of bending along the hull. If production starts it will be another through away product. But I agree that the idea is neat.
     
  5. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    If you look at the faqs section of the website they claim the boat should survive 20,000 fold and refold cycles. They have folded their own boats hundreds of times without issue.

    http://www.orukayak.com/pages/faqs
     
  6. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Old Woodbutcher

    I guess it would be good for a military river crossing or series of crossings to meet an objective, such as securing a bridgehead or sapper activity. Throw-away boats were/are quite common in warfare.
     
  7. kvsgkvng
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    kvsgkvng Senior Member

    I am not arguing. However I would be skeptical about self-promoting statements. From the apearance this is the same material which is used by US Mail for volume letter handling. I have seen enough of them in service to make my statement.

    I still think that the idea is neat though.
     
  8. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    I agree, if it was mine I'll just glass over it :D
     
  9. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Old Woodbutcher

    The resin would be incompatible(read that non-adherent) to the polyethylene hull. :(
     
  10. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Not a problem. Once the glass is cured you fold the polywhatsmecallit up and stow it somewhere. Then glue a 20mm flotation foam on the inside as well as some flotation foam furniture so it's soft to sit on at the same time and you're good to go ;)
     
  11. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    To make these parts fit snug in the shape you need a mechanical copy machine (like the one I built).

    If it see-saws then you create the opposite/inverse of a profile and the arms lengths should be 1:1 to make it the same size, by changing the ratio's you can get an under or oversize part. This is what you use to make the part that fits inside the kayak form.

    If both the arms are to the same side then you copy the part as is. This is where you will make the seat form from, you just copy another seat as it is, pref one you like.
     

  12. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I'm thinking it is this stuff "plasticor" not the USPO bin single layer stuff.

    http://www.duall.com/store/product/108821.108821/plasticor-corrugated-board-24x36-blue.html

    20K cycles sounds doable, in the lab. But what about after that crease beaches hard a couple times, gets left out in sun for a month straight, then attempts 100 cycles.

    Also the age thing, in any environment.

    I'd think they should have a "real" plastics guy confirming all the claims, hopefully with a warranty of sorts backed by a big plastic company, at least for the plastic performance.

    Looks like it could have several water tight compartments just form the folding.
     
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