Interesting design perspective

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by jehardiman, Mar 18, 2021.

  1. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Often in these forums I feel that many posters need an operational perspective about what a small vessel needs to do. Recently I have found a source of perspective that I can point to. Baker's Haulover Inlet is a man-made channel in Miami-Dade County, Florida connecting the northern end of Biscayne Bay with the Atlantic Ocean, at coordinates 25°53′59″N 80°07′26″W. The inlet was cut in 1925 through a narrow point in the sand between the cities of Bal Harbour and Sunny Isles. Because of its location, depending on the winds and tides it can get really rough with short standing waves just outside the channel and over the bar.
    Go to Youtube and search for "Haulover inlet", then randomly pick videos from the hundreds there and just watch.
    You will see everything from 12 ft RIB's to 120 ft mega yachts; with commensurate skill levels, not necessarily tied to vessel size.
    You can look at all the different hull forms and powering options. You see how many small vessels are put together and operated. You will see the effect of wave length to vessel length and how it generates response. You can see the effect of crest and trough flow with respect to propulsion. Because the inlet is so narrow and the cameras are right there, you can see the design details of individual builders and how they perform.
    Yes there are "professionals" and "weekend warriors" and "fenders out" fools, and yes there are camera man (person?) driven "deck jewelry" shots, but really is is about how actual vessels respond in less that DFC water.
     
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  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It's the run-out that causes the dramas, One thing though, there is enough depth a water there by the looks.
     
  3. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    There certainly is 'everything under the sun' on Youtube going in and out re Haulover Inlet - here are a couple of random links.



    Give it a catchy title, and it will rack up 'hits' fairly quickly - this one has had almost 2 million since December.

     
  4. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    It's like the Solent with wind over tide when blowing a SW'lry.
     
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  5. rangebowdrie
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    rangebowdrie Junior Member

    I've watched a few of those vids.
    The skill, (or lack of it,) of the "Captains?" seem to be of greater importance than the boat, but indeed, some of those boats appear to be, shall we say, out of their comfort zone design wise.
     
  6. cracked_ribs
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    cracked_ribs Junior Member

    So often in the Haulover vids it strikes me that in a lot of cases you could just slow down a bit and Bob out of there like a cork. They rarely seem to have breaking surf.

    There's times that Sand Heads south of Vancouver BC looks quite similar, only it goes on for a lot longer. Big silty river hitting the ocean, big tides, shifting sand bars from the silt, all facing into the prevailing wind.

    But no good spot to film from. And nobody running it at 50 knots in quad-engined centre consoles.

    As far as design goes, here's how that was reflected in my experience: I had a 4000lb deep V with an enclosed bow and a hardtop; I could exit in almost any weather at all. I never found the trip out especially harrowing but the way back in exposed a different side of the same boat: the heavy I/O in the stern made it want to wallow a bit in following seas and 12 knots was often too slow, but 20 way too fast. It often felt like you were going to get overtaken and swamped, although that never happened. But the re-entry was sketchy in bad weather. I probably did it a hundred times, if not more. 15 knots of wind and an incoming tide, I would do without a care in the world. 17 knots and an outgoing tide was a completely different story, and up around 25 knots on an outgoing tide was white-knuckle territory.

    So an ideal head sea boat, which I had, doesn't look much like an ideal following sea boat!
     
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  7. rangebowdrie
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    rangebowdrie Junior Member

    For following seas it's pretty hard to beat a Bartender, their prowess at running the bars and inlets of the PNW has become legendary.

    Bartender Boats
     
  8. BlueBell
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    BlueBell "Whatever..."

    Jehardiman,
    I agree, it is a great teaching aid.
    BB

    OMG!
    The footage beginning at 4:06 in the second video is astounding!
    MOB

    DogC,
    Is that a Sea Sled starting at 5:47?
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2021
  9. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

  10. BlueBell
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    BlueBell "Whatever..."

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  11. DogCavalry
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    DogCavalry I aim to misbehave.

    It says Freemann on it. I think. Or Freemam. The tunnel looks cat like. But I don't see any tunnel at the transom. So, maybe?
     
  12. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

  13. DogCavalry
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    DogCavalry I aim to misbehave.

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  14. DogCavalry
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    DogCavalry I aim to misbehave.


    I know I'm thumping my bible again, but the 1914 review of the sea sled, was that it seemed to be impossible to make it broach in following seas. We will see. I already have a case of adult diapers...
     
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  15. Howlandwoodworks
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    Howlandwoodworks Member

    I like watching the big Vikings and Hatteras sport-fishing yachts coming and going with their convertible flying bridge. They don't have much trouble it seems. Heavy displacement hulls with elegant deep Vs and S curve coming up from the keel to the sheer line can turn a wave into nothing but a mist.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2021
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