Intelligent Infusion - Robs rollup and glue for foam and glass

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by rwatson, Jun 21, 2017.

  1. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    rwatson Senior Member

  2. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    RWatson, thanks for the link. Here is the video embedded in this thread:

     
  3. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Even better, a direct link. The written commentary shouldn't be missed though - some usefull ideas there.
     
  4. jorgepease
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    jorgepease Senior Member

    I like the concept but is that shallow slot enough glue area. Leaving out the core on those slots/panels means that will be a flex point. The bulkheads have to make up for that without a fillet. Seems to be like you are going to have a bunch of stiff sections connected to each other with flex joints, like a train.
     
  5. scape
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    scape Junior Member

    Hi,

    I am actually in the process of starting this build! The 'intelligent' design ideas are really what interested me-- typical boat building is too time consuming for me, and the infusion process looks very efficient. I'm planning on a semi-custom plan design of one of the tenders as a first build; I'll try and post updates here if you want.

    -Chris
     
  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    I would be very interested to hear about the project, both from a building and final product point of view.

    Its rare that the building method AND the final product are so leading edge.

    Good luck with it.
     
  7. Jim Caldwell
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    Jim Caldwell Senior Member

    Yes, Please document the build here! I too am thinking about his process also. I can already infuse layups. So much easier, cleaner, accurate load paths, lighter and far less fairing time.
     
  8. scape
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    scape Junior Member

    About a year ago I came to Rob with interest in building a 25ft power cat; he's been great to talk to-- very knowledgeable and patient! After sitting on some concepts I waited about a year and rethought some things. I decided first to build a smaller boat, luckily he's working out plans for just such a boat (in tender form). My build design is for a small dinghy that can optionally sail. This is mainly to get my feet wet on this build process, as I still want to build the 25. The plans are still being finalized, but I'm aiming for a 12-13ft by 5 ft catamaran, powered by a 2-5hp outboard and also a small unstayed rig (I'm going to first try a sunfish lateen rig and see how it works out), expected weight is below 200lbs with a 4" draft. The design intends to have a cockpit that's above waterline, self bailing; seating on the side amas or above cockpit on a bench. Forward is a small storage box between hulls, which I plan on having the mast to slide into a mast step at the bottom of the box. I'll post back when things get started, probably in a couple months!

    And thanks, I'll need it! :D
     

  9. rob denney
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    rob denney Senior Member

    RWatson,
    Thanks for posting this. We made that video almost a year ago. Quite astonishing how much further the technique has advanced since then. The advice and edge treatments in the plans has now grown to several pages and 20 different edge treatments. And the possible hull shapes keep expanding as well. It has been a fun and challenging development which has made one off building much quicker, cheaper and lighter. We are now applying the principles to production hulls, although there are some indications that building these from infused materials will soon be out dated.
    Jorge,
    There is enough glue surface as the bulkhead glass goes around the bulkhead edge which also means there is no trimming or grinding of cured glass. Plus, the bulkheads are glued on all 4 edges, so there is nowhere for them to go. There is a hard point on the join, but on small panels such as these, it is not a problem. On larger panels and bulkheads, shelves etc not supported on all sides , the load is spread over a larger area, but the principle (no post infusion cutting, grinding or wet laminating) still applies. These load spreading methods can also be used on small panels, but it is a bit more work when setting up the infusion.
     
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