Inshore catamaran from mostly recycled parts

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by aussiebushman, Feb 15, 2015.

  1. aussiebushman
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Taralga NSW

    aussiebushman Innovator

    Some members may have seen the recent news about the loss of my trimaran (Ta Ta Triana) from a combination of theft and fire. I learned a lot from this $25,000 3-year exercise, namely:

    1. A trimaran is for speed - not comfort unless it is very big
    2. Never moor a boat where it is not in full public view
    3. Never moor it all if trailering is an option, so you can overcome most of the damage the marine environment will cause to an exposed vessel, including the need for anti-fouling.

    Because I retained the original trailer and managed to recover the amas also the mast, rigging and many other bits that would cost a lot to replace, also being fundamentally broke as well as stupid, I have decided to build a simple cat for inshore sailing, that doubles as a sort of houseboat for me and my dog plus the occasional visitor(s) who might want to sit in the cockpit for a drink and/or engage in a not too exciting sail.

    Please remember before rushing to comment adversely that this NOT essentially a new design - merely an adaptation of the existing hulls, with a smallish cabin and reduced rig. Therefore, I know the hulls float. where the balance points are located and so on.

    The hulls that were the former amas were rebuilt around A Class catamaran hulls using foam formers, strip planked Paulownia and 440 gsm glass cloth to provide a major increase in volume/flotation). (see pictures) The original A class clearance will be insufficient but that will be fixed by bolting 150 mm high longitudinal stringers on top of the existing (and new) cross beams, to raise the clearance to an estimated 400 mm - that should be more that enough for inshore use.

    The trimaran rig was damaged by the fire, but it was over 10 metres long, so cutting a couple of metres off the foot will not be a big deal and will improve the stability of the boat - I'm up for new sails anyway because the ones I had were stolen. The (only just added) stainless mast bands for the stays etc can be moved to suit and the wire can be re-swaged if it is not too corroded from being in the water for 6 weeks.

    The cabin will actually provide more usable space than I ever had on the Tri so it will provide all the comforts needed.​

    Attached are some sketch plans - not to scale, but remember I have the hulls here so it was merely a matter of measuring and working the other dimensions around them.

    OK, now tell me I'm mad and offer any suggestions please.

    Alan
     

    Attached Files:

  2. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    redreuben redreuben

    I would be more inclined to look for a donor main hull, like the Soling perhaps.
     
  3. aussiebushman
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Taralga NSW

    aussiebushman Innovator

    Afraid that is missing the points I raised - NO MORE trimarans for the reasons stated.
     
  4. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Beaconsfield Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    The pod of a Richard Woods Wizard may give you what you want.
     
  5. ThomD
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: TO

    ThomD Senior Member

    I can think of a lot of reasons not to build the center hull, but the idea it would be uncomfortable, compared to a boat built on the floats would not be one of them, I essentially already have both your projects, so I certainly wouldn't question your choices, and will watch what you are up to.
     
  6. aussiebushman
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    aussiebushman Innovator

    Thom

    With the tri option, it is not so much a matter of comfort - I had all that in the one that just got burnt - see pictures - but it is the skinniness of the hull that fundamentally restricts the available space. The cat provides an area of about 8' square (2400 X 2400) within the confines of the proposed cabin, plus a similar width for the cockpit and the fwd tramp. The headroom will be less than on the tri, but sitting headroom is all that is required. The sliding hatch over the entry will make access easier that the tri ever was.

    Reuben - yes the design of the Wizard is about right, but actually constructing the cabin will be no big deal. You might not be aware that I also built a Simpson 9.1 Signwave so I have plenty of experience building complex shapes - I may go for strip planked Paulownia again, but even sheathed ply will do for this one. All the strength is in the bulkheads - see drawing

    Because the boat will come out of the water and be covered when not in use, there are minimal problems with potential rot
     

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  7. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Have you looked at "Strings" designed by Meade Gougeon.
    It is shown in an article on Woodenboat, and probably on the Gougeon or West Sites.
     
  8. aussiebushman
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Taralga NSW

    aussiebushman Innovator

    Cute - actually a similar concept on steroids, but not for me thanks. Here is another one with what passes for a cabin on top of the hulls
     

    Attached Files:

  9. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Sell all your bits and pieces and buy a jarcat. You can find them pretty cheap and you would have a proper designed cat not a bitza. I like the jarcats and from what you described you would to. You will probably say thats not what you are asking but thats my 2 cents worth.
     
  10. aussiebushman
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    aussiebushman Innovator

    Thanks Brendan

    I am well aware of the Jarcat - it was one of the considerations before I built the Simpson Signwave - the former was rejected mainly because it looked like a floating horse-trough, no matter how well it sailed. Nothing since has changed that opinion.

    Besides which, the bits I have would be worth near-nothing as a sale - have you tried to sell second hand boat items? Conversely, my hulls have all the balance and flotation needed, the mast is still in fairly good nick and my labour to build another boat is not something on which I put a monetary value because I actually enjoy boat building and I have the time to do it!
     
  11. aussiebushman
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    aussiebushman Innovator

    "buy a jarcat. You can find them pretty cheap"

    Just for interest, a Jarcat 5 is currently for sale at $7,800 6's are very hard to find - the last one I saw had an asking price over $10k

    With apologies for being rude about the design, another issue is financial. I have worked out the materials list for the proposed build on the modified A Class hulls and cannot get to more than $2.5 K. This includes new Paulownia crossbeams and stringers. ply for the decks and cabin, epoxy and fillers. Perspex, internal framing & panels, carpet and paint.

    I have yet to dive to see what gear I can recover but s/s rigging, mast, anchor, anchor roller and chain are certainly there and I hope the winches and tracks were not stolen. I have some sails that can be recut and I'll need a new outboard, etc so add another thousand or so.

    Ignoring the labour that will bring the total to around $4000. Not everyone would go this way, but it will work for me
     
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  12. saltdragon
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: UK

    saltdragon Junior Member

    Yes ! Certainly worth giving it a go, as you say what have you got to loose, it will be interesting and one in the eye for the B.....d who destroyed the tri, and help get it out of your system;)
    One thought, do you need a solid cabin? would a folding canvas 'super' pram hood be sufficient. Something fairly robust like a convertible car roof. Lighter, I'm sure the dog wouldn't mind:)
     
  13. aussiebushman
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Taralga NSW

    aussiebushman Innovator

    Exactly! Getting rid of the angst is a major consideration. Also, I have the time and the build experience, plus many of the components. I'm going to the wreck today with 2 full SCUBA tanks to see what I can recover.

    Re cabin, canvas is a poor choice for me because I dislike excess heat and humidity. Here in OZ. 35 to over 40 degree C heat and 90% humidity are common. Ply in particular is simple to construct, easy to insulate with a lining of polystyrene, relatively cheap and with multiple coats of epoxy it is perfectly OK for a boat not left on a mooring.

    The dog, being a princess, probably would object. She is rather fond of her comfort - hence the dedicated bed!
     

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  14. saltdragon
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: UK

    saltdragon Junior Member

    Go to it, a cat for a princess, fingers crossed for the dive. 40 degrees in my dreams! Stuart
     

  15. aussiebushman
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Taralga NSW

    aussiebushman Innovator

    Some gear recovered

    Thanks Stuart

    I really do appreciate the moral support from you and others.

    The dive resulted in several things:

    Mast recovered - bottom 2.5 metres badly damaged by the fire but the remaining 7 can be reused

    Almost all of the S/S wire rigging and rigging screws are reusable

    Two Barlow 30 winches recovered - full of emulsified grease and mud but they have now been stripped, cleaned and will be OK after professional service. They will need rechroming but that is better than a grand for new winches. Interesting that the thieves removed the top plates but did not know how to remove the drums so could not get at the mounting bolts

    Pulpit recovered, ditto 2 anchors, chain and the custom made anchor roller that also secures the main forestay

    Lots of alloy beam sections that can be used to construct the new cross beams and a tabernacle for the mast under the deck

    Heaps of 316 stainless bolts

    That's about it - everything else stolen or destroyed by fire - including the sails, wet & diving gear, generator, fresh water bladder, new fridge, deep cycle battery, solar panels & controller, outboard motor, night vision, GPS, etc etc.

    What a pack of bas#ards

    Alan
     
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