I'm to design a canal cruiser that can handle high seas...

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by solitaire, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. solitaire
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    solitaire Junior Member

    I'm to design a type of boat that is ruggied enough for canals yet having sea handling abilities that can easily accept 1m/ 2 - 3' waves on larger lakes or coastal areas. I figured multi-hull for ruggiedness and stability in terms of displacement variations. But I'm a bit confused about cats, trimarans, SWATHs and those Grainger DeltaForm designs.

    That's really the dilemma here: you should be able to walk around the boat and it having the capacity to take 1-6 people without leaning over in roll, yaw or altering its draght considerably. Yet on rough seas providing a reasonably smooth ride.

    Being designed primarily for canaling the maximum dimensions would be a draght of 1.5m, a beam/ width of 4.5m and stand 2.5m tall above the surface of the water.

    I figured a vessel at 6m long, 2.5m wide, or 8m long and 3.5m wide, with a draght of perhaps .5-1m. It's most likely to have a maximum speed of perhaps 10-15kt on open water.

    Feel free to through suggestions at me at your leisure! :)

    Edit: Oh, it's for motor propulsion.
     
  2. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    you are dangerous
     
  3. FMS
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    FMS Senior Member

    Could you define if this is a boat you want to actually build or have built or if it's an academic project.
     
  4. solitaire
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    solitaire Junior Member

    You think so? Would you care to elaborate on that, please?
     
  5. solitaire
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    solitaire Junior Member

    But of course. This is a boat I want to build and wouldn't mind some experimenting, though perhaps not on the cutting edge academic level.
     
  6. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    The size you propose is much small than the canal size limitations you give. What about the canal use will change the design?

    Do you know of any boats which are similar to what you are thinking of?
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Solitaire, I think the real question is how much yacht design expertise do you have . . . as these questions suggest little, which suggests an ill advised adventure/project.
     
  8. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Sounds like the, "..I would like a really really fast boat, but at the same time, carry an artic lorry and a house.."

    Your principal dimensions suggest only one type of boat, a boat suitable for canals, yet the SOR of canal cruising is incompatible with your other objectives.

    Suggestions...ok...it's called compromise and understanding how your SOR affects design.
     
  9. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Why don't you design a sea going boat that can go on a canal. I dont think any one would notice the difference.

    An offshore class life boat would go on a canal.
     
  10. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member


    you got it
     
  11. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

  12. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

    solitaire, an aide-mémoire for you, in your endeavours to reinvent the wheel.

    Draught: breeze or light wind.
    Draught: drink, usually drawn from a barrel.

    Draft: depth needed for boat to float.
    Draft: written document to pay money from one bank account to another.
    Draft: conscription.
    Draft: write a preliminary version of a picture, document, or plan.
    Draft: pulling heavy loads.

    How wide is your canal?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narrowboat

    Paul Fisher already has designs for canal use. Scroll down

    http://www.selway-fisher.com/Mcover30.htm

    Start with something compact.

    http://www.woodenboat.com/build-boat
     
  13. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member


    Tongue planted firmly in cheek... I hope!
     
  14. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    I don't believe there is a sailing requirement... motoring is what he said.
     

  15. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    Sounds like a good place to start. I'm hazy on the canal conditions though... how deep?, is there current?, How much room required between opposing vessels?, Long term live aboard or Vacation housing?, normal occupancy?
     
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