I'm in the market for an outboard

Discussion in 'Outboards' started by Commuter Boats, Oct 3, 2016.

  1. Commuter Boats
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    Commuter Boats Commuter Boats

    I'm in the market for an outboard, I'm still open as to a manufacturer but I'm favoring Honda / Tohatsu at this time, I'm trying to compare their warranties but not being a lawyer I'm having a little trouble.

    My best bids at present have about $2,500. (US) between the two with Hondas being more money.

    Any input, warranty experience, or testimonies that help you make a decision would be appreciated.

    I'm in need of a 250 horse, 20 inch shaft. Some of the manufacturers have limited offerings in the 20 inch length but I'm not willing to raise the mass of the engine 5 inches on this vessel.

    Thank you in advance of any insight, experience, etc.
    Gerald
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What is the rationale there ? The boat will become unstable ? That would be a pretty ordinary boat, if so, the market for 20" engines in that hp size would be very limited, so your trade-in value will be reduced. What kind of hull is it ? Unless relatively flat bottomed, I'd prefer the security of having the powerhead further off the water.
     
  3. Commuter Boats
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    Commuter Boats Commuter Boats

    The boat is 31' x 7', lighter than average (2.5 tons ) with quite a bit of house. There's a light duty tow bit ( 25 inch shaft would raise the tow point 5 " ). The vessel is all foam / fiberglass and I've worked very hard to keep the center gravity as low as I can.

    I've included a picture of a sister, same hull, this one is extended 4 feet ( two additional feet of planing surface, 2 foot molded bracket ), different house.
    Warped planing surface ( modified V), 15° dendrites at the transom, so it's not particularly deep.
     

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  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    OK, well if your experience says 20" shaft gives adequate clearance off the water for the particular boat, so I guess that is the way to proceed, particularly taking into account the tow set-up. 20" suits boats used for water-ski-ing, so there is a market.
     
  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I don't think you will find a new 250HP outboard for $2500. They are closer to $13,000 on sale.
     
  6. Commuter Boats
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    Commuter Boats Commuter Boats

    I appreciate your attempt to help but I don't think you read what I wrote.
    " My best bids at present have about $2,500. (US) between the two with Hondas being more money."
    My bids are coming in between 18 and $23,000 US
     
  7. Commuter Boats
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    My second post should read, "15° deadrise at the transom", for approximately 33% of the vessels length the deadrise is 20°, flattening slightly towards the stern.
    Not a very common hull shape today, somewhat of a marriage between a rum runner of the 30s and a hard chine Ray Hunt style deep V.
    Gerald
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If there is no danger of the powerhead being too close to the water , and you are not worried about a possible lower resale/trade-in value, then it is an easy choice, stick with 20" engines. Switching to 25" would necessitate mounting area changes, so why bother, unless you feel you are restricted in brand choices.
     
  9. Commuter Boats
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    Thanks, yes I'm very comfortable with the 20 inch, the vessels designed is mine, I have intended to put a 20 inch on it from the start but I did not perceive the difficulty in finding a suitable outboard.

    I've been asking similar questions on another forum and a gentleman that works for dealership that handles both Honda and Tohatsu has responded and I feel much more assured that Honda and Tohatsu are equivalent.... The biggest difference appears to be a paint job and whose name is on the warranty.

    It's always desirable to have a good dealer network backing up a purchase like this and neither of these engines are represented locally adding to the challenges of me making a decision.

    Mercury and Yamaha are represented locally but I've eliminated the Mercury Verado because of its steering geometry, the Mercury two-stroke 250 XS can't match the fuel economy or warranty of the Honda, Yamaha doesn't have an offering in a 20 inch transom and so their out. Evinrude is so high tech that it must be installed and maintained by a factory trained technician ( which is not available to me ), and Suzuki ( also not presently represented ) doesn't have much of a charge system.

    So you as you can see, my choices are challenging and I'm working really hard to sell myself on the Tohatsu which comes with a pretty attractive price tag, a 90 amp alternator of which they claim 60 amp is available for battery charging.
    The Honda / Tohatsu is also considered to be relatively easy to maintain.

    If there's holes in my logic, I hope that somebody will enlighten me :)
    Gerald
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    20 inches was standard for many years and those thousands of boats have not sunk. I think that it means they work OK. However, the extra five inches of freeboard keep the engines drier. There are less problems with water ingestion or wet ignition systems.
     
  11. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    "The extra five inches" does not always mean "five additional inches of freeboard". On the other hand, has anyone had problems with an outboard motor on a rainy day?
     
  12. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Unless you are crazy, you won't install an outboard with the anti-ventilation plate 5" below the waterline. Therefore, the transom will have 5" more of freeboard.
     
  13. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Who said that?, not me.
    You are not using correctly the term "freeboard".
     
  14. Commuter Boats
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    Commuter Boats Commuter Boats

    I would agree, freeboard would be the point at which the volume of the boat that is supposed to be dry begins to flood...
     

  15. Commuter Boats
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    Again I believe that we have a disagreement of terminology and application. The level of anti-ventilation plate is all about its relationship to the keel and the operating conditions of the boat. The static water line influences the engine only if it's too high in relationships to the engines internal workings.
    Gerald
     
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