I'm going to build my first boat(section)

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Lemans, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. groper
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: australia

    groper Senior Member

    Steve`s point is worth noting - ferro is well suited to larger heavier displacement type hulls, whereas other materials like plywood and composites are better suited to lighter, smaller, efficient hulls.

    Plate steel is another material thats really only suited to larger, heavier displacement type hulls and why you dont see small boats built from plate steel. You also dont see many small ferro boats either for the same reason - its not a good choice to make in a small boat.

    Your boat is ideal to make from plywood or strip planked timber, or composites... aluminium would be a fair choice also... but steel or ferro = not so good.

    Have a look at what your doing, your planning to make the ferro part of the bow smaller and smaller.... when you finish working this out, the ferro will be gone altogether...
     
  2. beernd
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: Netherlands

    beernd Junior Member

    In the Netherlands plate steel is a very popular building material, for small vessels, there are numerous plate steel rowing boats, which are famous for their ruggedness, and endless repairability.

    It is also a material that is very forgiving toward neglected maintenance.
     
  3. Steve W
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Dave, i havnt seen my old boat for 35yrs or so so dont know how it has held up,i only kept it a few years due to wife problems (if i had it to do over again i would have kept the boat instead of the wife) Typically a WELL BUILT boat of any material has a very long life. If you have the displacement to work with it is as good a material as any apart from the resale value.

    steve.
     
  4. Dave T
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Location: Anamosa Iowa and North Buena Vista on the Mississi

    Dave T Senior Member

    Steve

    I hope your wife doesn't read your last post. I guess I must be lucky my wife would probably get rid of me before she'd let me sell the boat I named it after her.

    Lemans

    If I was going to build a boat in sections I would probably use something like a steel shipping container for the center section and build the bow and aft sections with wood sealed with epoxy and paint. The ends of all sections would be closed and the framework would be constructed with cross braces that would be drilled to bolt to the center section. Weld channel iron cross braces in the container to match these. Between the sections I would have vertical 2x6's that would be spaced apart so that water would be able to drain out, these would be attached to the bow and aft sections and also coated with epoxy and paint. The wood would be able to give a little when the sections were bolted together with out damage. While Ferro looks like it would be great if the whole boat was made one section and the weight wasn't an issue I don't think it would work for a boat built in sections.

    Dave T :)
     
  5. Lemans
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Belgium

    Lemans Lemans

    FC/Steel connection.
    First to build are the two steel halves of the upper section.
    If build in 1,5mm steel it should weight about 79 kg.

    The two halves joined together can be used as support for the 5mm iron bars witch I intent to bend according to printed templates. All the bars will be welded to create the mesh.
    It's also my intention to plastering the cement against the steel upper section.
    Ones dry and unbolted, both materials(sections) can be separated to add the rubber joint.
    It should work... in theory.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. beernd
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: Netherlands

    beernd Junior Member

    You are not solving problems, you create them.
    After all your alterations, what is the use of the concrete bits.

    Stripbuild, cold mould or use steel.
    Or build the whole thing in Ferro cement.
    This Is going nowhere.
     
  7. Lemans
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Lemans Lemans

    All the material cost no more than 150€. The only reason for not trying is the probably enormous task of destroying the ferro-cement under section when it becomes useless.
     
  8. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    You're going to build a 10 X 35 ft boat for $191.
    On what planet?
     

  9. Lemans
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Belgium

    Lemans Lemans

    No, I'm just going to buy the material for the parts you see on the drawings on this page for 191$.
    I don't think you can call that a boat.
     
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