ignition switch

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by whitepointer23, May 13, 2011.

  1. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Change the switch and stop squirting parrafin in it,--what that supposed to do,--fix it?
     
  2. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    when did i squirt anything in the switch frosty.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    God you must be old as hell Frosty. They don't use paraffin in much any more big guy . . .
     
  4. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Old as hell? I certainly am sir --I was 59 last week.

    Oh Ok well some one said squirt WD 40 in it.

    If its a petroleum derivative its not much else, maybe a jet fuel viscosity.

    I read that WD 40 was used to protect missiles from rust waiting to be fired.

    I personal find it quite soothing as a haemorrhoid ointment and mosquito repellent,-- thats what the little red tube is for,--- a kind of "everything for the beach" but ive never squirted it in ignition switches. There no hole any way,--it should be spark proof.
     
  5. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    i will be putting new switchs in. might even use a toggle switch and starter button for each motor.
     
  6. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    Yesterday I watched a friend trying to start his 40 HP Mercury countless times, then told him to stop burning his starter motor.

    Mercury has a red capped ignition on/off switch on the remote for this model and I saw with my own eyes it was in the on position. I turned it off, then on again and with the next try the engine fired immediately.

    So much for "marine grade" factory installed switches....
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Whitepointer, make sure the starter switch you use is a momentary closed type. It's a spring loaded thing that engages the circuit when you push the bottom. A horn button is the classic example of this and the type of switch I use when installing a separate starter switch. I even have one on my garden tractor, installed when the key switch took a dump.
     
  8. Mark Cat
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Michigan

    Mark Cat Senior Member

    If you are redoing your helm for ignition and start, it may be good to consider an engine emergency shut down switch if one does not exist for the engine controls. In an emergency it is easier to hit a big red mushroom switch than hunt for the key.

    Mark
     
  9. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    Nobody will argue about the need for an emergency shutdown switch, but it is the way this is implemented that causes problems.

    Mercruiser uses a cheap black push button, held down by a black plastic cap. If the cap isn't pressed down all the way the ignition is switched off although the cap looks OK.

    The Johnson/Evinrudes have a tiny switch that is kept up by a red plastic fork, attached to a wrist strap nobody ever uses. All parts are UV degradable plastic, the switch is not waterproof and the strap doesn't float, so the seabed near the coast must be littered with these things.

    And Mercury has a seemingly better solution with a red capped toggle switch and ON/OFF embossed, but they had no real budget for safety features and installed the cheapest switch they could find.

    The emergency situations I've been in during the last 50 years or so were mainly caused by an engine stalling during gear shift or simply refusing to start while the rocks were just a few feet away.
    And the big block V-8 exploding because a piston broke free also didn't need an emergency cut off, but if you feel you need one, install a good quality switch like a C&K with potted base and slide a red silicone condom with a molded in nut over the toggle.
     
  10. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Off for electronic ignition is on (contact) even removing the loom plug renders the engine live and able to start if it were turned.
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've never found a kill switch necessary. In most instances, the damage is done long before you can react or reach the kill switch. On the other occasions where you need a quick shut down, the ignition switch has been perfectly satisfactory. If you run over something and bend up your gear, the big red button isn't going to matter much for the 1 second time savings difference, it takes to reach the regular ignition switch. If the engine tosses a rod, starts to knock or other wise warrants a quick shut down, again having a fraction of a second quicker shut down is meaningless. Whatever has happened has already done it's deed and you've got bent stuff.

    On PWC or sport boats a deadman's switch is a good idea, but only because the likelihood of being parted from the vessel is fairly high. This is different and automatic. In this regard (automatic) I think some switching is a good idea. Low oil pressure, high coolant temperature, etc. could kill the ignition possably saving the engine. Some newer boats are so equipped, but very few older craft are, which is a sin considering how easy a circuit it is to arrange.
     
    1 person likes this.
  12. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    only if we are talking mag cd like an outboard (or an aeroplane that still actually have magnetos)
    everything else is power to run
     
  13. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    USCG wont allow shutdown except for operator ejection hence all the go slow functions built in when overheating etc.
     
  14. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    i normally use the brass body hella starter buttons and a relay near the starter, and a quality toggle switch for ign . chrysler electronic ign is power on .
     

  15. Mark Cat
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Mark Cat Senior Member

    @powerabout

    Can you tell me the USCG original of the no kill switch requirement?

    33CFR?, 46CFR?

    Commercial, Pleasure?

    Gasoline, Diesel?

    Where,

    Thanks,

    Mark
     
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