I want to buy/have built a 150' trimaran.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Slipheed, Jul 3, 2009.

  1. Slipheed
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Slipheed New Member

    Hi,

    Who would build or sell a 150' trimaran? Any info would be helpful.:)
     
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Build? every larger yard.
    Sell? nobody, i doubt there is one at the market.

    And: sailing, motor, hybrid?
     
  3. Eric Sponberg
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    I believe that there has never been one designed that is that large. I am presuming that you are talking about a sailing craft. Therefore, you should consult a naval architect to design one for you, and he can then help you find a shipyard suitable to build it.

    A 150' trimaran is going to be very wide, and lifting or slipway dimensions will be important. There may not be too many yards that can both build and launch such a craft.

    Eric
     
  4. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    simple solution, build at one yard and then move to another to launch
     
  5. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    I would design it to be build in three pieces and assemble after launch....
    Or build a very large dry dock first....
    Apex, what do you think something like this would cost to make just hull only in Wood Epoxy?
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    We cannot build such vessel you know. Except for the smallest shop none of my yards are closer than 3 miles to the sea. We had even to launch our (by so far largest) 43m on the road! And that size multihull vessel is not designated to be built in wood epoxy, Alu would be the better choice! But playing some figures, why not. I guess you are not going to nail me down on my estimation and order it?

    Just the hulls? Assuming a 45x7x1 meter hull and 20x2,2x.30 amas? OK?
    hull about 95 tonnes, amas about 5 = 105 tonnes @ 55€ per kg when built in Europe = 5.77 Mio €
    Compared: Alu @ 22.000€ tonne = 2,31 Mio €
    Right.

    Wood epoxy has its limitations............
     
  7. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    I have seem large Tri's like 60' x 30' feet made from plywood and epoxied. So your saying Aluminum is cheaper... Also a lot lighter, better performance. Who would have thought. 43m by road... Wow.
    Your talking hull only on price?
    I guess you price will scare a lot of the dreamer around here into reality...
     
  8. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Well a 60 ft is a toy compared with 150" you know. And in the 60ft range wood Ep is competitive! But from that on Alu wins the race in terms of cost. Above some 100" or so I guess even in terms of weight. So, my comparison was not a "real world" one. But of course for a rough guesstimation it was enough.
    And yes it was hull / deck only!!!
    On top of that, if you would like to get it built by Abeking & Rasmussen, the builder of "Hetairos" one of the most (the largest?) sophisticated wood Ep vessels ever, you can easily estimate twice the price! The overall cost per manhour for a skilled shipwright is 65€ in Germany.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  9. Jimbo1490
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    Jimbo1490 Senior Member

    Why do you think they still build (most) airplanes in aluminum? Composite only competes with aluminum on weight or stiffness/weight when the composite is carbon skins over nomex honeycomb core. Fiberglass or wood/fiberglass won't cut it.

    The all-fiberglass composite airplanes built by Cirrus all suffer from being overweight with poor useful load compared to the all aluminum Cessnas, Pipers, Socatas, and a host of others. It's less laborious to build in composite; at least for airplanes it is. So there could still be reasons to build this way but weight savings is not one of them.

    Jimbo
     
  10. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Jimbo, not wood / fiberglass, wood / Epoxy in my case! And a good wood / Ep construction outperforms a fiberglass one in every single aspect. On smaller boats every other material except carbon composites too! It is hard to make a general statement for all those materials given. Even when we talk just about boats.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  11. Jimbo1490
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    Jimbo1490 Senior Member

    If wood epoxy could compete with Carbon on weight or stiffness/weight, then surely we'd still see a few racers built this way but alas, we do not. When F1 cars were still riveted aluminum and bonded aluminum, there were a few plywood cars (!) that competed pretty well, believe it or not. The plywoods were all hand made in place laminates,
    but still it was freakin plywood!

    But as soon as the carbon revolution hit in the early 80's the plywood cars could not compete any longer.

    I'm going to build a wood Tornado one of these days, but I don't hold any hope of it being competitive with the fleet racers, which are all carbon/nomex.

    Now the price/performance ratio is another matter! I know I can build my T for about 1/4 the cost of carbon by building in tortured plywood, and still get 90% of the performance of a carbon boat. But a 90% boat would finish dead last in a typical race, as you know :(

    Jimbo
     
  12. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Ähh, sorry Jimbo, did you possibly miss or overlook a part of my post?
    especially this: >>every other material except carbon composites<<

    And I know already what plywood is............ I produce several hundred tonnes a year! Cold moulded.
     
  13. Jimbo1490
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    Jimbo1490 Senior Member

    Yes I did :)

    Wood Good
    Alum for zoom
    Graphite Super Might

    Glass is ***

    :D

    Jimbo
     
  14. Jimbo1490
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    Jimbo1490 Senior Member

    Richard

    The funny thing about this thread is that a typical tri has something like a beam 50% of LWL. That's the beauty of the multihull after all; all that righting moment from the beam. But can you imagine this guy trying to find a port :D He's going to have to park next to the cruise ships; no normal marina even has channels that wide! :D
     

  15. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Come on folks, anyone truly capable of entertaining such a project, wouldn't be here, doing a touch me - feel me session. Someone tossed a bare hook and 'ya all bit.
     
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