I want to build a dinghy to race in my later years

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by WhiteDwarf, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. WhiteDwarf
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    WhiteDwarf White Dwarf

    I want to build a single handed dinghy I can race despite growing infirmity into my later years. My knees make it hard to kneel for two hours in the bottom of my Firebug; I want to have space and depth, yet retain planning performance. Length not above 13 feet to permit beach launching.

    Any suggestions? I’m thinking perhaps Clinker Plywood construction.
     
  2. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    =====
    Something like this is certainly worth consideration. The WETA is designed with a planing main hull and can be very comfortable. I'm building a performance small tri specifically because it can be designed to be so much easier to sail than a skiff yet have equal or greater speed-a design like this can have much less reliance on physical movement for RM. The Weta is easy to trailer and takes up no more space than a dinghy when stored.
    A similar ,slightly smaller tri can be designed to allow the crew to sit in the center of the boat and/or just on the side of the cockpit while retaining planing performance.
    Just something to think about-good luck!

    click on image:
     

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  3. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I expect you ment a monohull, but that's not my interest.

    Please check out the "drifter" series of boats. http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/gu...er12/index.htm
    Possibly you could go a little longer and still beach launch, I've seen a cradle with two wheels used to move the boat like a wheel barrow.
    I'll admit I don't know how you will find a race, most places still don't want to handicap multis with monos. This style of boat is sailed from a seat in the main hull, kind to knees and backs that are "well used". I suspect the design could be tweaked to add more conventional sail, main and jib, relatively easily.

    Additionally Solway Dory has similar boats, a little more sophisticated, but I don't know if they have a 12' one. http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/bo...t-build-mini-trimaran-40815-2.html#post506537 shows an 18'

    Good luck,

    Marc

     
  4. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    How about a Goat Island Skiff? Your countryman got that one right for a simple boat that goes well.
     
  5. WhiteDwarf
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    WhiteDwarf White Dwarf

    Messabout, Thank you for that, I have several reasons for not pursuing this design; with all respect to BoatMik:

    1) My club has a limit of 15 ft LOA. GIS is 15ft 6 ins.

    2) Although we sail on a river, we get the full benefit of Sydney's infamous "southerly busters" - more bouyance required than the standard GIS + raised fordeck with coaming and side decks. Also worried that the flat bottom would pound something dreadful in a short confused sea.

    3) I would like a more challenging build;

    but

    4) I do like the simplicity of Lug rig with reef points

    Tom Dunderdale (Campion sail and design) has some designs that are close, but most are too long, or too Swallows and Amazons. I may be getting old, but I still want to get up on the plane when the breeze is fresh.

    I said max length of 13 ft with a view to handling on the beach, more than anything else. Again, thanks Messabout.

    Doug Lord WETA is interesting and thank you, but I am a mono man as UpchurchMr surmised...- White Dwarf.
     
  6. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

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  7. WhiteDwarf
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    WhiteDwarf White Dwarf

    Michael, Thank you for that, but too long and too heavy for my purposes as described.

    Many years ago, I owned a Jacksnipe. Design by Jack Holt, sponsored by the UK Snipe class to put a modern (GRP) hull under a Snipe rig. Brilliant hull design, but project abandoned by the Snipe class.
     
  8. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

  9. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

  10. blueseven
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    blueseven New Member

  11. NoEyeDeer
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    NoEyeDeer Senior Member

    What's wrong with this one? He reckons it'll plane if given enough wind.

    http://www.campionboats.co.uk/html/apple13.html
     
  12. WhiteDwarf
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    WhiteDwarf White Dwarf

    NoEyeDeer, I have been in contact with Tom Dunderdale regarding the next size down, Icene, which he sees as relatively domesticated. Yes, I will certainly but the Apple 13 on the short list.

    Blueseven - Yes, the Sabre is a possibility, definitely.

    Thank you to both of you.
     
  13. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    The Mirror 10 would be an obvious choice, it can be sailed/raced singlehanded. Or other Jack Holt designs.

    My father has just gone through the same thought process. He is 87 and still races his dinghy in the English Channel

    He has two problems: One, getting the boat out of the water and over a steep shingle beach. Two, he can no longer lean out backwards as he would fall in. Obviously he cannot EVER capsize as he couldn't right the boat nor get back in.

    So he has just bought a Walker Bay 10 sailing version with inflatable collar to replace his old dinghy. I know you cannot build it, but otherwise it sounds almost ideal for you

    I'm getting old as well, but my "geriatric dinghy" will be a "sort of" B14 with outriggers. So something like a faster Weta built in ply

    Enjoy your sailing, whatever you chose

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  14. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready


  15. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    The important detail for old guys like me is a high boom.
     
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