I wanna build a boat.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Jubal, Dec 20, 2021.

  1. Jubal
    Joined: Dec 2021
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Nashville TN

    Jubal Junior Member

    I would like to build a simple boat with a cabin

    Here are some inspirations of mine

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    All these examples are far more quality than I desire.

    Basically I would like 7X7 plywood or metal shed on a boat.

    I am considering using 55 gallon drums but I have access to proper plastic pontoons from a manufacturer purchased for 192 dollars each.

    This means if my boat is 12 foot long it will take 8 floats at a cost of 1.5k just for floats.

    I would like to cut costs but am not sure how much this will effect the water worthiness of the vessel.

    So here are some of my cost cutting theories, if you all would evaluate them for problems

    Using 55 gallon drums 80$ X 8=640$ ( im unsure if drums will allow the boat to move efficiently)

    Using 6 floats to create 9ft of pontoon with floor 1.5ft overhang. ( im unsure of how this will affect balance)

    Combing floats with drums. (I don't know that this is possible as they are different diameters)

    Any tips would be great
     
  2. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell . . . _ _ _ . . . _ _ _

    What is the SOR (Statement Of Requirements)?
    Look it up... what will the boat have to do and under what conditions or circumstances.
    Without knowing these variables, how can we advise?
     
  3. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: Control Group

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Welcome to the forum.
    Economy is important but safety is more important. Cut safety to save money could result in drowning.
     
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  4. Jubal
    Joined: Dec 2021
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Nashville TN

    Jubal Junior Member

    Sorry I had these but I must have cut them but not repasted them essentially this would be a long trip boat, from Knoxville to Memphis.

    Just to say I did it.

    Step 1 get a cool story

    step 2 meet girls

    Step 3:???

    Step 4 profit
     
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  5. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell . . . _ _ _ . . . _ _ _

    You didn't look it up....

    Have fun, it's a great project.
     
  6. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Welcome to the Forum Jubal.

    Are you planning on a sort of 'Huck Finn' type of cruise, drifting gently down the river?
    Gogle tells me that the distance by road is about 400 miles - but when I look at a map, I see that Knoxville is on the Tennessee river, and Memphis is on the Mississippi. Are they connected?

    The boats in the first two photos above look fairly cool, with 'proper' pontoon hulls, rather than hulls made from barrels.
    The boat in the third photo is strange - is it a trimaran, with another hull to the left of the photo?
    I wonder why they need two enormous gas cylinders - are they cookin' lots of fish, re all the lines that are out?
    The boat in the last photo looks comfortable, but she also looks like she would have a lot of resistance (relatively) to move through the water.

    Re meeting girls, I am not convinced that too many would be impressed by Huck Finn type boats, unless you can find a gal who is a huck finn type :)

    Re step 4 profit - I think that one can safely say that you will not make a financial profit in any form by building a shanty boat - but you will certainly profit from the experience.
     
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  7. Jubal
    Joined: Dec 2021
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    Location: Nashville TN

    Jubal Junior Member

    The trip will be powered not sure by what motor though

    The Tennessee river starts in Knoxville flowing south, changes west in Georgia and the goes north until it bleads into the Ohio river. The Ohio links up with the Mississippi
     
  8. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Sorry, but I am not too familiar with the geography of your rivers.
    Will all of the route mentioned above be downstream?
    If so, then you can pretty much drift a lot of the way, and just have a small motor for steering.
    But if you have to make headway against the current - then you ideally need an efficient hull form coupled with a suitable engine to do the job.
     
  9. Jubal
    Joined: Dec 2021
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    Location: Nashville TN

    Jubal Junior Member

    The current will carry me 100% during the journey
     
  10. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

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  11. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: Control Group

    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Now I just learned how Tennessee got its name.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee_River
     
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  12. Andrew Kirk
    Joined: Jul 2021
    Posts: 97
    Likes: 68, Points: 18
    Location: Chorley UK

    Andrew Kirk Pedal boater.

    I'm planning a new boat using floats made from PIR insulation boards. An 8' X 4 ' X 4" board will give around 280 Kg or 635 lbs of flotation. It is closed cell so won't become water logged but has little strength so needs plywood or similar to make it sturdy. I'd imagine each sheet will cost less than $100, comparing UK prices. It could work for you and allow you to cut through the water better than barrels.
     
  13. Tiny Turnip
    Joined: Mar 2008
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    Location: Huddersfield, UK

    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    You're gonna need to find some gnome buddies to help you collect the underwear for stage 3... ;)

    Seriously, those are some big, bad rivers you're talking about, and you'll need something pretty seaworthy, I suspect. Certainly steerable. If you haven't, check out the route in detail. Are there any: rapids, shoals, dams, locks, ships or barges to negociate or avoid? Will your boat be able to keep out the way of one of these?:



    'River Horse' by William Least Heat Moon is a great read. He crosses the continent from NY to Oregon in a 22 foot boat, with minimum portages.
     
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  14. clmanges
    Joined: Jul 2008
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    Location: Ohio

    clmanges Senior Member

    That won't cut it. If you drift into the path of one of those barges, you're history, full stop. Anything you put on the water with those MUST have adequate power and maneuverability to give them a very wide berth. They push huge wakes, too.

    I think your safest strategy in areas of barge traffic would be to hug the riverbank as closely as you can, but you still need some power and maneuverability even for that.
    Do you desire 'disposable' then? Because to me, that's the next level down in quality from the worst of the examples shown. Build a platform and pitch a cheap polytarp tent on it.
     
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  15. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell . . . _ _ _ . . . _ _ _

    Jubal, why did you start a new thread about the same thing?
    Didn't like the way this one was going?
     
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