I have Milky oil

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by chef2b86545, May 30, 2007.

  1. chef2b86545
    Joined: May 2007
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    chef2b86545 Junior Member

    Haven't changed it yet but when i checked it back in april it was a little high.
     
  2. Callinectes
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    Callinectes Junior Member

    A high milky oil level usually indicates that coolant has leaked into the oil supply. You said the level was a little high, if you have a cracked block, you would probably have twice as much oil on the dipstick as you usually have. Were you running a correct antifreeze mixture, or do you have straight seawater cooling?
     
  3. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Earlier he mentioned it was raw water cooled, and that the bilge had filled prior to the last time the engine ran, after which the oil hadn't been checked util recently, when the milky oil was found.
    While not winterizing last fall, freezing raw water trapped in the block/head would not have mixed. This is milky oil.
    I mentioned that water probably made it's way in when the bilge filled. I don't know how deep it filled, but I've had this same thing happen.
    The oil, he said, was "slightly high", which I would take to mean not much water, and if bilge water, would not have had salt in it, so recommended cleaning the crankcase thoroughly and replacing oil, and checking frequently, as the source is most likely bilge water and not (unless a new problem has occurred) cooling water.
     
  4. chef2b86545
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    chef2b86545 Junior Member

    i took the head off and it looks like it was just the head gasket. But i have a couple more questions. Do i need to use a torque wrench to put the head back on? And where would be a good place to go to get all the gaskets that i need to replace after taking the engine apart?
     
  5. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    I don't see my first response, but wanted to add SEQUENCE of head bolt tightening is another thing you need to be familiar with. To be honest with you, if you can spend for the half hour or minimum charge to have the torquing done by a trained dealer mechanic, you can't go wrong. The rest is less critical, but pay close attention to manifold torque values too.

    Alan
     
  6. Callinectes
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    Callinectes Junior Member

    Look for an authorized Mercruiser or OMC dealer(I don't know what kind of engine you have) You will help the dealer out if you have the engine serial number with you(serial# on mercruisers is on the valve cover). You can get the gaskets there, and pick up a shop manual while you are at it. The shop manual will give you all the torque values you need, and it will give you the tightening sequence, as Alan mentioned, that is essential for a good seal. Get a torque wrench from Sears or Home Depot for about $70. As long as you pay attention, this isn't a big deal. However, I have found that the certified technician is always a safe bet. Good luck!!
     
  7. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Did I post a link on another thread? There were two and I think that link is on the other. OMC parts.
    I believe VIP auto parts rents tools like torque wrenches, if money is tight this week.

    A.
     
  8. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Torque settings are for people that dont know when a bolt is tightened to its limit.

    Just 30 years ago RR didnt give torque settings. (if you dont know when its tight we dont want you working on our engines ) They would say.

    Tightening sequence is no mystery --Like rolling do-- start from the middle and work out (progresively).

    Torque values are dependent on the size of the bolt the thread and the material you are pulling on.

    At a guess I would say 60 to 80 foot pounds. thats 60(30kilo) pounds on a 1 foot long bar.

    Even and in sequence is more important than the actuall torqe.

    A wheel spider is an exelent head tightener.
     
  9. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Frosty... those were RR car engines, not aircraft engines, right?
     
  10. chef2b86545
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    chef2b86545 Junior Member

    Thank you every one
     
  11. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

  12. krush
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    krush Junior Member

    good luck. Sometimes those 4bangers just crack externally or blow out a casting plug (improperly called freeze plug).

    I wouldn't rule out a cracked block though. It's almost guaranteed to happen if you do not winterize.
     
  13. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Krush has a good point---- check the block out carefully. There are ways to do this beginning with visual inspection, and maybe someone knows further tests (dyes?). A small crack is a potential problem--- sometimes fixable if on the outer casting.
    A.
     

  14. krush
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    krush Junior Member

    sometimes on the 3.0 liters people get lucky like i said and only crack the outer part of the block (under the intake/exhaust manafold is a good place to check). If you crack the outside and not anything internal, it just means water leaks out of the engine...slap some marinetex or jbweld on that baby and make sure your bilge pumps work!

    Internal crack means water gets in oil and you are bascially toast. In the small blocks it usually cracks in the lifter galley. Cast iron is strong, but brittle...it doesn't flex when ice expands!

    Like I said, hope for the best, but you better plan for the worst.
     
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