I can't get my 1988 four winns vista to start

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by Mcmanus256, Jun 27, 2015.

  1. Mcmanus256
    Joined: Jun 2015
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Boston, ma

    Mcmanus256 New Member

    I just bought a 1988 four winns vista with an omc engine. It has been winterized since 2013. It cranks a little bit but now really strong. I tried it with one battery. It was smoking at the rear of the motor. I also have two drain plugs that I don't know where they go. Can anyone help? please :)
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 494, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    The very first part you should buy for this boat is the engine/drive manual. It'll be the best $35 bucks you plop down on this puppy. I hope you didn't pay a bunch for this old gal and why didn't you have someone look her over, before you did?
     
  3. AndySGray
    Joined: Jun 2014
    Posts: 296
    Likes: 13, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 91
    Location: Cayman

    AndySGray Senior Member

    Not turning over strongly and smoke coming from back of motor is likely your main battery and earth cables - terminals loose or corroded or some cheapskate didn't get the terminals properly crimped and soldered.

    Remove all the spark plugs and turn over to see all is free and she should spin nicely, fresh plugs and a little gas trickled into the carb (remove the container before starting as they can blow back and ignite the bottle) and see if she'll fire.

    maybe a fuel shut off somewhere you've not found?
     
  4. Mcmanus256
    Joined: Jun 2015
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Boston, ma

    Mcmanus256 New Member

    No luckily I got it for cheap money... Anybody know about these types of motors?
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 494, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Many of us work on the OMC's all the time, but you haven't ID'd it yet. What's the model number and year? You seem to be at a lose for the most basic of diagnose procedures, so the manual is the first thing to consider.

    [​IMG]

    Again, the best $35 bucks you'll spend and after you go over the basic trouble shooting stuff, you'll have a much better idea of what to look for and likely many more questions. You probably have a early Cobra, which have a number of common "issues" associated with them.
     
  6. Mcmanus256
    Joined: Jun 2015
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Boston, ma

    Mcmanus256 New Member

    The model number is 574aprgdp. I have the Manuel it hasn't been very helpful
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 10,401
    Likes: 1,035, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If you pick something up very cheap, the usual reason is it has faults that need attention, unless you have a little mechanical aptitude, you are going to run into obstacles. Even if you are "handy", it could easily be a money-muncher to get it up to scratch.
     

  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 494, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    As I suspected and first gen, small journal 350, with a 4 barrel carb and a Cobra stern drive. Typically right hand rotation and the drive has a list of common issues, so many so it was revamped after only a 3 year run, which fixed some of the issues, but created others. The Cobra and Super Cobra drives where at the very end of the life of OMC. This isn't a drive I recommend anyone purchase.

    This said, you have it and if it's seen reasonable care and modest use, you should be able to get it going again.

    First up is the small block. This is the most common engine in service and easily understood by any mechanic. Even an automotive mechanic will instantly recognize what it is and the basics about tune up and problem diagnoses. Marine parts are often different than automotive, but the principles are still the same.

    The first thing to do is run though the tune up and adjustment procedures in the manual. You'll look at the spark plugs, check fuel delivery, etc. Once you've "leveled the playing field" it'll probably start right up, assuming a healthy battery, good connections, fresh fuel and functioning electrical/fuel systems.

    Nurse maiding you through a basic assessment process is a whole book, so just work through the basic testing and tuning information in the first couple of chapters in the manual. Simply put, you'll quickly find it if the engine has a good spark at the plugs and is getting fuel delivery.

    Without more specifics about what's going on, it's hard to offer much help. For example, is it getting a good hot spark at the plugs? Is the engine spinning fast enough? Can you see a healthy squirt of fuel into the venturis when you crack open the throttle? In a nut shell you look to see if it's getting fuel and spark. If no spark or it's weak, obviously you have an ignition issue. If it's no fuel, well the fuel delivery side needs attention.

    Most of the time, if the engine has sat neglected for some time, the fuel system is "varnished up" and must be cleaned. This usually means disassembling the carb, cleaning it very well and reassembling it to spec's. It also means the whole of the fuel system should be checked for blockages, leaks, etc. Usually, when I pick up a boat like this, I simply assume it's been neglected and do a "major tune up", by replacing the plugs, wires, cap, rotor and making sure the basic settings are right. Then I usually change out the belts, hoses and the other common "consumable" items, like the oil filter, fuel filter, etc. I check and often clean the carb and use fresh fuel. With the "playing field leveled" I know what I have, that it's tuned properly, with known good parts and it usually just fires right up.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.