Hyperlast DOW chemicals

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Vulkyn, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

    Well i was doing some investigation and ran into an old friend who works at DOW chemicals.

    He told me about Hyper-last
    http://www.dow.com/hyperlast/product/hyperlastprod/marine.htm

    Now what i understood is that this material creates water resistance, abrasion resistance and uv resistant material.

    Now providing i apply this to polyester FRP boats, would that help protect the surface AND properly seal water as to minimize osmosis?

    And on wood / epoxy boats, would this product replace the matt fiberglass layer on the outside of the hull??
     
  2. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Don't know this specific product more closely but in general all polyurethane paints do the same. Uw parts better with epoxy based products IMO
     
  3. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Hyperlast is one of the new, emerging product line of the latest polyurethanes. Most of these are cyanoacrylate activated to some degree, though cyanoacryalte free products are also being introduced. This typically are high film thickness polyurethanes, much like spray or brush on truck bed liner coatings. I've been involved with some product testing on these new goo's and they do preform quite well.

    As to Vulkyn's question about a moisture barrier for his GRP yacht, sure it'll work, though application can be difficult to say the least. Many of these products dry to the touch in about 5 seconds, so they have to be sprayed, which naturally requires a special gun and some experience shooting this stuff. The cost will easily rival an epoxy barrier coat (if not exceed it), which will likely also be easier to apply. Colors are limited and gloss retention is a weak point, but you decide.
     
  5. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

    thx PAR ! yah they put them on caterpillars buckets to protect the metal underneath.

    Does it offer a stronger abrasion resistance than an epoxy coat in GRP polyester? if it doesnt the only advantage would seem its UV resistance.
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Do you paint or varnish your first boat?
     
  7. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

    I am not sure but since the boat has a very nice wood look to it i would rather varnish it to retain that look.

    I am asking about the GRP for learning purposes :D
     
  8. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Oops,

    yeah, the ability to read can be a real timesaver................ I missed that.
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Epoxy has a better bond to GRP then these polyurethanes, but it's fairly relative as both stick very well. These polyurethanes don't come in clear and usually have to go down quite thick, like 20 mils minimum, 30 mils would be typical. That's enough materiel in the coating to require precautions around certain tight fitting things. Given the choice, I'd go with epoxy and an LPU over coat, to get all the benefits of a good top coat.

    As for abrasion resistance, these products come with "texture" to improve abrasion resistance. Some include shredded Kevlar, which is quite tough, most just use ground up polyurethane pellets. I didn't test smooth surface coatings for abrasion, but I'd guess they are softer then epoxy in this regard. They are very tough, but reinforced epoxy is probably tougher.
     
  10. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

    Thx PAR in other words very little added value. However the cost different is around 1/3 of epoxy. I did not take into consideration the thickness like you mentioned, so a valid comparison is difficult with out knowing how much it will take from both material to properly achieve an efficient thickness for the job.

    What surprises me is with the current knowledge and gathered knowledge regarding GRP polyester construction specially osmosis, why aren't manufacturers adding epoxy or polyurethane layer to stop or even minimize that problem? (well some add vinyl-ester as far as my limited knowledge).

    Oh and by softer you mean weaker or less brittle i,e more elastic?

    I will be "using" my friend for a run down on DOW's chemicals :D might as well learn something from him !
     
  11. mydauphin
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    Most manufactures sell junk... Expensive junk. They could do it a lot better for a couple extra dollars. Look at fittings and lights.
     
  12. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    They are. All manufactures have switched to polyester resin types that are less prone to osmosis, with a few actually laying up their hulls in epoxy and many using vinylester. Custom builders have done this long before the manufactures.

    The polyurethane coatings may have some advantages under the LWL, where their anti fouling properties can be of some benefit.
     

  13. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

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