Hydroptere-61 knots(70.15mph) Peak

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Doug Lord, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

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  2. Silver Raven
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    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Gooday cobber. Thanks fo posting - now how do I sleep for the next 2 weeks ???

    Golly - Gosh Can I do that ??? Please Can I have one of those ??? Gawd I wish I wasn't so bloody old - What would I give to go for a sail on that !!!! Waaaaaa - I want 1, I want 1 of those - repeat, repeat etc.

    As a side comment - without letting the cat of of the bag - Gary - what if ??? - I could put those outer foils into/on something else - would that make it 'cruise' faster & maybe I could go into shallower water - he he he - stop laughing - - but I'm only 1/2 joking - Ciao, james
     
  3. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    Some discussion on Sailing Anarchy pointed to an interesting article about a new computer controlled system that will be used to trim the attitude adjustment on the rudder foil (in French)

    http://tendancebleue.com/vitesse-a-la-voile-2/lhydroptere-entre-mode-manuel-mais-assistance-electronique.html

    A google translation of part of the article

    A pot luck and almost like a campsite, another technician whose two laptops are carelessly laid in a brothel scholar, next to the toolboxes on a plank of wood wedged between two trestles, is the taff. The last press conference we learned that the DCNS had a team dedicated to the electronic management of the rear foil, Alain Thebault us this, tells me that it is the man for the job. The discussion will be fruitful. Actually everything is under consideration. Assistance from the rear foil that lifts the boat taking off and that holds then (bars / spoiler) is a difficult subject. The problem is, moreover simple. To act on the inclination of the wing, what information does it have? Mainly base data but not only. Explanation: The hydrofoil will be equipped with an inertial. A kind of magic box containing gyroscopes, gyro, acceleration sensors and angular rate and calculating in real time and in a very precise location information, of course, attitudes (pitch, roll) and dynamic (velocities and accelerations) in the three axes of the boat. We can combine these data with other parameters such as wind direction, the rudder for example, the heading, efforts in the rigging etc. ... The boat will also be equipped with two radars, which measure the front and height at the rear of the hull from the water, always to give more information about the attitude of the bird and the position in relation to the water. But these cameras positioned so that they are effective and are not misled by the first wave is not clear. Remainder term that is managing this mass of information to derive actionable information through a specific program, which will drive the appropriate actions. But the DCNS has some experience on the subject ...

    In short, over time, the plan holder will be "computer assisted" as they say. Many people thought that was the case previously. But by the admission team, unlikely to be operational for the LA-Honolulu record, time is very short. Remains the joystick near the steering wheel that controls an electric motor which acts on the same angle, and the "leg" of the team that has seen other but must have finger safe at night off the coast U.S..
     

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  4. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  5. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Hydroptere-Fastest Sailboat on the Planet

    from Scuttlebutt last night:

    FOILING ACROSS AN OCEAN: IT'S TIME
    By Kimball Livingston, Blue Planet Times

    "Five corsairs on a dream boat" is Alain Thebault's description of himself
    and crew as they prepare for the first-ever transoceanic sailing record
    attempt on foils.

    California-Hawaii.

    Los Angeles-Honolulu.

    Their giant trimaran (59-feet), L'Hydroptere DCNS, has never before been far
    from France, but this flagship of all foilers worldwide holds the absolute
    speed record over one nautical mile - 50.17 knots, 57.7 mph - and for a time
    it took the 500 meter record away from the kites. There's nothing else quite
    like it.

    The mojo: L'Hydroptere's in-water foils are angled at 45 degrees, and they
    lift the boat when it reaches a speed of 10 knots. The hulls rise about 15
    feet, and speeds can jump to 25 knots in 10 seconds or less.

    The team's engineers estimate the foils take more pressure than the wings of
    a jet fighter. Somewhere around 50 knots, the foils begin to cavitate, and
    the beast becomes, shall we say, temperamental.

    Thebault and his team have put in plenty of miles in the Med and the English
    Channel, but undertaking an open-ocean crossing of 2225 miles is
    unprecedented* in the world of foil-born sailing craft. L'Hydroptere has been
    long in development, and if she proves up to the open ocean, she's a threat
    and then some to the existing record of 4 days, 19 hours, 31 minutes held by
    Olivier de Kersauson and the maxi (111-foot) trimaran Geronimo. Can you say
    "determination"?

    The starting point was Thebault in 1985, abetted by Eric Tabarly, testing a
    foil-borne model in a pond at Versailles. In 1987 he sailed a one-third
    model, and in 1994 he launched the real deal. Then, for the next eleven
    years, it was a learning curve all the way.

    The headlines were all oopsies and almosts and Baby Fall Down Go Boom until
    the Channel crossing record of 2005 and, in 2008, the first outright speed
    record over 500 meters, 51.37 knots, raising the bar from kite sailor
    Alexandre Caizergue's 50.26. In 2009, L'Hydroptere claimed the nautical mile
    record at 41.69 knots (video), raising windsurfer Björn Dunkerbeck's
    previous mark of 41.14.
    -- Read on: http://blueplanettimes.com/?p=8904

    * not unprecedented, but exciting as hell nonetheless: David Keipers foiler "Williwaw" 20,000 miles across the Pacific years ago-the incredible Williwaw video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cYXxZiL4B8
     
  6. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Fastest Sailboat on the Planet

    I saw this letter to the editor in tonights Scuttlebutt and thought it was interesting and moving: ( I've written to Craig Lewick, editor of Scuttlebutt to make sure that posting this letter is ok with him and Mr. Baldwin and to ask Craig to forward to Mr. Baldwin an invitation to participate in this thread)
    As per the response from Craig, here is a link to Scuttlebutt: http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com Hope Mr. Baldwin will post here soon...



    From Casey Robert Baldwin, Nova Scotia (re Scuttlebutt 3610):

    About a century ago, F.W. 'Casey' Baldwin designed a number of sailing
    hydrofoils on Nova Scotia's Brasdor Lakes, with the help of Alexander Graham
    Bell. On an around the world trip in 1911 Dr. Bell and Baldwin had viewed a
    strange motor craft, invented by Enrico Forlanini, rising on horizontal
    ladder rungs, clearing the hull from the water, on a Northern Italian lake.
    Both were intrigued and Baldwin, a passionate sailor and veteran of the 1906
    Canada Cup, immediately began the design of sailing hydrofoils on their
    return to Nova Scotia.

    They were an underwhelming success, principally because of the heavy weight
    and lower strength of materials of the time, but occasionally became
    foilborne. The modern success of the fantastic L'Hydroptere and the
    wonderful little foiled Moths is a testament to our advancement in the
    strength and lightness of materials.

    With Dr. Bell's encouragement, Casey designed a 60 foot cigar-shaped powered hydrofoil which set the world water speed record of 70.86 mph in 1919, that held for ten years. Baldwin's principal contribution to hydrofoils was
    dihedral, angling the foils for a smooth lift, a change from Forlanini's
    horizontal foils.

    Now gone for over 60 years, my grand-father would be amazed and pleased at the astonishing speeds sailing hydrofoils are currently attaining. God rest
    him.
     
  7. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

  8. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Fastest Sailboat on the Planet

    ======
    Thanks, Corley-didn't realize they might start on the 5th of July if the conditions are right....
     
  9. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I suppose they are thinking they will pass beneath the debris field? I keep thinking of the big sky theory used for years in aerospace but of course the sea is more crowded because things just need to float not fly.....If they've sorted out flotsam detection it could really benefit the masses.....
     
  10. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    It's really great that they are going out to have a crack at a real ocean record. Racing boats should be risked on such ventures it's not like they are going to whack out a few bulkheads and turn this boat into a charter mule when it's competitive life is over.
     
  11. Silver Raven
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    Silver Raven Senior Member

    Corley - you just wish you could be out there next to them to watch it happen. Betcha Doug, Gary & I would like to be there also.

    Am still trying to beat dd pnu in both sides - so no good to anyone - cripes - can't think let along breath. Did you still want some info of 'B' class wing - or were you just lookin-for-fun ??? Catch yea - have a good weekend, james
     
  12. Corley
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    Thats no good Silver Raven. I know what pnu is like had it myself 5 years ago pushing too hard at work and not taking good care of myself the curse of the self employed businessman. A bit like sucking your breath through a straw all you can do is stay warm and rest. I am very interested in the B class rig and how it worked, Lock came up with some really innovative ideas.
     
  13. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    I knew you were sick James, just thought it was in the head!:) Get better soon, I want to ask you about a foil section.
     
  14. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    A few photos courtesy of the SA News page Hydroptere has arrived in Los Angeles in preperation for their record attempt to Honolulu (Hawaii) and been unloaded from the transport ship.
     

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    Last edited: Jul 4, 2012

  15. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

    Far out ! Check out the beam on that nasty !
     
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