Hydrolic System for Spud

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by internetturk, Aug 24, 2009.

  1. internetturk
    Joined: Sep 2006
    Posts: 51
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Turkey

    internetturk Junior Member

    hi everybody,
    I need some information about hydrolic system of the spud? Also I need some information about spud types.
    Thanks,
     
  2. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    Mycorrhizal networks provide a potential pathway for the transfer of hydraulically lifted water between spuds.
    Roots may be linked by shared or common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) that constitute pathways for the transfer of resources. The movement of water by CMNs is potentially important to survival during drought, and the functional ecophysiological traits of individual mycorrhizals may be a component of this mechanism.
    There are two fundamental methods by which water can move from one place to another: Diffusion and Bulk Flow.While gases can be compressed into smaller and smaller spaces, liquid water is not so compressible (some people even believe that a "boom" would occur when spuds achieve "plane" on a compressable media, but, of course not). Thus compression of water into a space surrounded by a cell wall produces turgor pressure. This form of hydraulic pressure is critical, for the opening and closing of stomata, flow processes in translocation in the phloem, exchange of materials within and between compartments, and for the rigidity and support for herbaceous (not supported by lignin in wood) plants. Turgor keeps petals and leaves extended into the air and prevents wilting.

    Units of pressure are:
    1 atmosphere = 14.7 lbs in-2 = 760 mm Hg = 1.013 bar = 0.1013 M Pa
    typical tire pressure is 0.25 MPa. !

    Capillarity, because of the slight charges of water moleules, and the fact that opposites attrect (water molecules obviously organize themselves through hydrogen bonds), because of diffusion but remember about bulk flow and its importance and osmosis and why water goes into the spud and not out!

    Did you mean the "spud" that's for a boat? Others are certainly more qualified to tell...
    Potato[1].jpg
     
  3. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 110, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Most of the spuds I have worked with are simply dropped in place and a deck crane pulls the spud to get underway.

    IF you are talking about a self jacking spud barge , where the barge is lifted from the water a few feet by climbing up the spuds, the method I have seen is a rack welded on the spuds and a geared pinion lifts the barge.

    But don't ask ME about the math to get this right!!

    FF
     
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