Hydraulic Propulsion AND Generator

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by nkurb, Dec 24, 2013.

  1. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Its not that old. Hydromar of the Netherlands put together this system. 30 kw...PTO, 6kw 24dc and 220 single phase.
    The system performs as designed...but way too expensive for normal people. The oil tank holds 150 liters. A new proportional controller is on order...I was afraid to ask the price.

    Small craft shouldn't play the game. To complex and high maintenece .

    Diesel electric sounds better to me.

    I believe Lister Petter also uses Kubotu diesel engines for their small air and watercooled generators.

    An air cooled could be advantageous on a houseboat. Clogging of the seawater cooling system with harbour junk is always and issue.

    Might be worth looking at.
     
  2. nkurb
    Joined: Dec 2013
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    Location: Toronto

    nkurb Junior Member

    I am mainly trying to keep a simple and integrated system. But I'm also getting the vibe that the hydraulic systems should be avoided. Personally, I have not had bad experiences with hydraulics, but I can see others have.

    My main concern with simply slapping a high output alternator on a propulsion engine in the name of power is that it will most likely end up being chronically underloaded. Most people know what that can lead to... and for the most part, the owner may pay for the consequences of this in a mid-term timeline.

    The ease of grabbing a Honda generator is appealing. I'm not opposed to the idea, I'm simply exploring other options. Once again though, an 'integrated' solution would be a part of the boat, and run on diesel. Neither of which the Honda would be.

    Anyone know of a way to easily 'load' a neutral diesel?
     
  3. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Perhaps you need to figure out your battery bank size....and then what type of batteries.

    No point in having a large-ish genset with a tiny house bank that can't accept much amperage.
     
  4. nkurb
    Joined: Dec 2013
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    nkurb Junior Member

    Its in the 600 AH range... AGM. That accounts for 300 AH per day. Quite a bit, but the design is built for potential use as a houseboat in places like Yellowknife, NWT (which believe it or not, does have quite a large all year houseboat community). All day diesel hydronic heating can add up... as well as lighting, etc.

    The generator is not meant for just charging, but access to AC as well. Heavy load items are better off direct from a generator.

    I actually stumbled across a piece of equipment that Beta Marine puts out that fits the bill quite well actually. One of their diesels with a '3.5 KVa Travel Power AC'. Seems to fit requirements quite nicely. Now I wonder if they are accessible in Canada....

    http://www.betamarine.co.uk/inland/Beta_SuperSilent/supersilent_inland.html
     

  5. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    But I'm also getting the vibe that the hydraulic systems should be avoided.

    The question is POWER required

    A large HP hyd pump and motor are fairly cheap, a 20-40 HP electric motor and controller is WOW!!! priced.

    Operating a very small diesel at variable speed to make DC is a cheap option for house power ,and would not die from underloading but you will still need a bigger propulsion engine.
     
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