Hurricane Sandy

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Leo Lazauskas, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    I just read that the crew have abandoned the replica of the HMAS Bounty.
    Crew safe and well so far.

    What are the chances that the ship will survive? Or is that too difficult to predict?

    Good luck to all those in the path!
     
  2. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  3. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've heard she is about 160 mile west of the storm and left to her own devices, she may fair well, depending on how they left her and how much water she has taken on. Crew is safe at the moment and the USCG will pluck them up from the two life boats they're in. Apparently they lost a generator and couldn't keep up with boarding water. I can assume the skipper stayed with her until they lost their engine, so it's debatable if she'll survive. She's currently in an off shore wind situation, so maybe she can stay off the shoals. Yet another antique design, put out for sail training, will sink.
     
  4. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    Thanks Paul.
    I read that one Hercules plane had to turn back because of crew fatigue, but another was on its way.

    Our thoughts are with you all.
    Don't forget that zombie apocalypse training if it gets really bad! :)
     
  5. magwas
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    magwas Senior Member

    I don't know more about tallships than what you pick up watching Onedin Family, but I thought normally they should not get very much water even in a storm. And I also thought that there are hand operated pumps and buckets on board with enough capacity to bear with more than the income.
    Are my assumptions wrong, or did something happened to HMS Bounty what haven't been mentioned yet?
     
  6. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Caught the news this morning, Bounty is lost. The crew were transferred safely to the boats and a few had been taken off by the US Coastguard. At least they are in radio contact with land and their location is known. News report was one of the USCG J-Hawk helos had to return to base with problems.

    Crew size is 17 per TV report, which seems small for handling an old-time square rigger of that size, especially in a storm, although modern rigging and power pumps would help offset that. Presumably she had been readied for the storm and was motoring, lost the engine and was swamped; one wonders if she could have been saved with some sail . . .

    News link http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2012/10/29/ns-hms-bounty-hurricane-sandy.html
     
  7. Leo Lazauskas
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    CBC have reported that she has now sunk.
     
  8. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    - crew size was 17 according to owner but only 16 according to manifest. The USCG reported seeing 16 heat sources. The 14 reported in the boats have now been rescued by the USCG and 2 lost at sea. Thank you, USCG!
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2012
  9. viking north
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    viking north VINLAND

    As wooden boats go she was getting old even when one considers the constant rebuilding. Typical example is the Bluenose-- her hull was so bad it was totally condemmed and run thru the chipper. Contrary to government proclamming so this is not a rebuild but a completely new vessel barring possibly some of the rigging. I did have the pleasure of walking both vessels decks but memory wise will retain what seems to me in this case the fitting and natural end of the Bounty. Strange when you compare the lives of two vessels. The replicas endings were opposite to the origional and with each other, when compared by the intentioal hand of man and natural occurance. Lets hope they find the two missing.
     
  10. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    And a bit o rudder and some sailors.

    Is this a volunteer crew. Certainly not what men used to be even though they have sea going life rafts and EPIRBS.

    Makes you wonder why they build these identical vessels when they dont have the crew.
     
  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    If you have a wooden ship you need iron men to sail her.
     
  12. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Bounty's normal complement of paid crew was 18 according to the ASTA website. http://www.sailtraining.org/membervessels/vessel.php?@=122 Sounds like she was on a passage with paid crew only.

    Bounty was built for the 1962 film. She was claimed to have been built following the "admiralty plans" but "Displacement and length were doubled, and other dimensions increased by approximately one third to accommodate the large 70 mm cameras used in the filming." Also engines were installed. So not the same as the original. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bounty_(1960_ship)
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2012
  13. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    The original had a crew, counting William Bligh, of 42 when the mutiny occurred.
     
  14. Stephen Ditmore
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    Stephen Ditmore Senior Member


  15. liki
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    liki Senior Member

    I have doubts that modern work safety requirements would allow the crew to try to handle the rigging in a storm these days.
     
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