Hull shape modeling examples.

Discussion in 'Software' started by Alexanov, Sep 26, 2020.

  1. Alexanov
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    Alexanov Senior Member

    Hello everyone. I am looking for some videos, manuals with kind of explanation how to build hull shape from scratch in cad programs. I have got quite many questions from naval architects students about hull shape. Sometimes they send me models from different cad software. I wonder where they learn how to build the models? I have a feeling that most of them use models generated from some library files and have no idea how to use software right way. In most of the video of hull shape modeling, most of the time shows long way of preparation of initial data Offset table, frames, existing lines drawing and etc., but not modeling itself. Very often it is just examples with generating of “dream” hull shape from the library in 5 min. Real process of hull shape modeling takes much more time than you can see in some kind of “advertising” video and often not looks simple and easy at all.
    But, if you a naval architect student, where you can learn it? Maximum they can get is free version of software, but without any right training. Teachers in university is not pay so much attention for that.
    Soon the new naval architects start to work somewhere and will learn it again? It is maybe ok, but I think basic principals they have to get from university. What is your opinion?
     
  2. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Only 5% on naval architects can design hull shape with software, and 1% - by manual drafting. And they learn it by natural way by talent. Just leave with it; don't intend to teach everyone - waste of time ;)
    PS I did my first lines plan what I was 11. By hand! No one taught me.
     
  3. Olav
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    Olav naval architect

    In general, this is not wrong at all. Most new designs are derived from previous designs and are only an affine transformation of a (hopefully successful and well-known) hull shape with maybe some tweaks here and there to match the specifics of the SOR.

    YouTube is quite full of tutorials for the more common software packages. But as with any other software, it takes some practice to fully master the capabilities of the programme. Also keep in mind that CAD software is only a tool and it takes much more to really design a ship than only the knowledge on how to press some buttons - a common misconception of many laymen who stumble across something like FreeShip. Although the work is quite different, it's not a bad idea to start drawing and designing by hand.

    Same with me, apart from the fact that I was around 10 years old when I started drawing lines plans and making my first hydrostatic calculations and such - and from that time on I knew I wanted to become a naval architect. And hey, here I am! Honestly I feel very privileged being allowed to make a good living from my childhood dream job! :)
     
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  4. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    That is awesome. You were, without a doubt, a child prodigy. Congratulations, it took me many more years to perform my first hydrostatic calculation.
     
  5. Olav
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    Olav naval architect

    Well, we're talking very basic stuff like displacement and centre of buoyancy here, using Simpson's rule - nothing fancy like damage stability or something. ;) So no child prodigy, just a little boy interested in boats...
     
  6. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Here is some things I usually point to when a topic like this comes up.
    How is the LWL achieved in design? https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/how-is-the-lwl-achieved-in-design.37330/
    Lines Plan https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/lines-plan.29882/#post-310553

    Really, as Alik and Olav said, you should at least do the first few by hand. It doesn't need to be a full up ink on mylar engineering drawing, a scaled sketch will work. Then you learn to fight with the software to get it to do what you want.

    You just need to get into the thought process of how it all goes together and in what sequence. Sailboats are all about smooth flow lines and appendages, cargo ships are all about volume, motor yachts are all about house appearance, etc. FWIW, actual design is one of the last things taught in a Naval Architecture university program, because in order to get an acceptable design, you have to know how all the other systems and physics fit together and interact.

    Also like Alik and Olav, I knew very young what I wanted to be. I think almost all NA's start out wanting to work in yacht design, and dabble in it (like myself) even when they find other things that put food on the table. In my years as a Naval Architect working for the US Navy, I have worked with many yacht designers (self employed and otherwise) and boat builders "between offices". Some have returned to the private sector in yacht design, others went to other civilian NA jobs, some complete their government career. Of the ones that went back to yacht design, they were heavily involved in the social networking of the field, which is actually fairly small. Over the years I learned two truisms; 1) hydrodynamicists are born, not made, and 2) the whole world only needs about 5 to 10 Naval Architects to do design, everyone else just copies and varies to suit their needs.
     
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  7. Alexanov
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    Alexanov Senior Member

    Exactly. Hundred years ago design company often had just one NA, same as shipyard.
     
  8. Alexanov
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    Alexanov Senior Member

    This is very important for right understanding of process in general. May be draw it not exactly by hands, but at least with lines in AutoCAD. Every time when you work with for ex. GA drawing you have to interact with lines drawings and should have some knowledge how to solve simple tasks, like making new section based on existing lines. I found that 2D GA drawings from skilled NA perfectly fit with 3D lines from CAD.
     
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  9. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    But on the other hand, there were many more boatyards and people with design offices'.
     
  10. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    In fact, easiness to 'design' the hull shape in CAD software has removed the natural barrier for dummies entering boat design. Decades ago, a naval architect or draftsman in design office spent years learning secrets of hull shape design, fairing, calculations, lofting, sea trials... gaining experience and all-round knowledge. Today, anyone with the software can become a 'boat designer' in 2 weeks! Well, we all saw such guys here on forum (say, look at Maxsurf thread - this is where they make appearance), and in real boat design practice, too.

    I always say that boat design is about understanding of boats. Not about drawings sleek profiles, not about the rules. Not about software, too.

    There are many talented people who have understanding and can design boats, not being naval architects (of course, to certain extent - there will be natural limits). However, I always recommend to get formal education if one wants to get involved in boat design.
     
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  11. Alexanov
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    Alexanov Senior Member

    And too many ugly ships.
     
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