Huge land yachts

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by JustACreative, Feb 21, 2011.

  1. JustACreative
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    JustACreative New Member

    Would it be possible to make a land yacht in the size of a caravan - so that like on a boat you could live on? I've read of land yachts from the Chinese from 500 A.D. that sailed the plains of China with up to 30 people. But I haven't come across a "boat" carrying more than 3 persons over land today. Of course, there is no real need for that - or is there?

    I am thinking on an ecofriendly way of travelling across land mainly by the power of the wind. A large kite pulling the vehicle would be best, since the high altitude winds are more stable and I'd have less heel. Of course you couldn't drive anywhere, but if you look at rather vast areas like let's say Mongolia, or Central Australia where they have quite strong winds ... but proof me wrong. To develop a suspension that withstands all the shocks and impacts is the other thing.

    Thankful for any feedback or info.
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    All the inventions I know of either never left the drawing board or didn't work. There are small ones on wheels that do well on compacted and rather flat terrain.
     
  3. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

  4. JustACreative
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    JustACreative New Member

    I've seen vehicles like that, but I'm thinking of even a bigger one, and one that can go off-road, but maybe I am too blue-eyed?
     
  5. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    This one left the drawing board......

    _Zeilwagen_Simon_Stevin_.jpg

    Made in 1602 by Simon Stevin (Flemish guy) for the Dutch Prince Maurits. Picture by Jacques de Gheyn II from Antwerp.

    This Land Yacht 'Zeilwagen' was capable to do Scheveningen - Petten, ca. 90 km over the beach, within 2 hours with 27 people on board. This 'Zeilwagen' and the prototype (also on the picture) was in long time use for entertainment of the guests of the Prince.

    Please post a modern variant if you have...

    See ‘‘Whike’’ for a one person recreational vihicle. It's a hybrid from wind and human power.

    CatBuilder's picture looks like a ‘‘Duo Quest’’ with a kite.

    Good Luck..!!
    Angel
     
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  6. kroberts
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    kroberts Senior Member

    I've seen what amounts to an ice boat with wheels on it, making a tricycle.

    You would need a road free of bridges, overhead signs, trees, ....
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Where does the time and speed data come from? 45Kph for two hours seems incredible without bearings.
     
  8. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    You need to go West...then seek design guidance from the High Plains Drifters while chewing Peyote buttons.
     

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  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    There is a lot of text on the picture. I think it's a description of the 'Zeilwagen' and a report of the 2 hour drive from Scheveningen to Petten.

    But I couldn't read it. I got the data from the Dutch rijksmuseum.
    Distance Scheveningen Petten is ca. 78 km lineal but the beach has a curve. The ca. 90 km is my rough estimation, it could also be ca. 85 km. Which still is fast in 2 hours.

    And knowing Simon Stevin (look him up) I wouldn't be suprised if it had bearings :idea:

    Cheers,
    Angel

    PS

    Just looked up 'Hollandse mijl' / 'Dutch mile' / 'miliare Germanicum'

    A 'Hollandse mijl' is a one hour walk which is ca. 5 km.
    But it also is the same as the French 'lieue marine' which is 5555 meter.
    And it is also the same as 20,000 Amsterdam feet which is 5660 meter.
    And it is also the same as 20,000 Rijnlandse feet which is 6280 meter.
    (we have metric now :))

    So I guess my first rough estimation for Scheveningen - Petten, over the beach, ca. 85 ~ 90 km is about right...
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    My research shows that the "Dutch Mile" was actually a kilometer. That seems to make more sense.
     
  11. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    That was after the introduction of the Dutch metric system in 1820.

    The distance Scheveningen Petten was ca. 78 km lineal in 1602 and didn't change... So the dutch mile info from before 1820 make sence here...

    Cheers,
    Angel
     
  12. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I see
     
  13. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    Great thread.

    There is a narrow peninsula, Spurn Point, which 'hangs down' into the mouth of the Humber Estuary.
    A railway was built from the mainland garrison, down the peninsula, to serve the garrison at the
    end.

    In the early 20th century, two wagons were fitted with sails, and were used as a practical form of transport
    up and down the 3 miles or so of track, well exposed to prevailing winds, and with the
    track providing both low friction and high keel effect.

    http://beta.thisishullandeastriding...hing-past/article-1831740-detail/article.html

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Although not the 'off road' individualist approach you're looking for, the Rail Sail approach does offer the advantages noted above.

    More here, at other locations, UK and the Falklands:

    http://www.copsewood.org/ng_rly/sailbogie/sailbogie.htm

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The attached image is Spurn Point.
     

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  14. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Great post Tiny, thanks..!! But better post the big pic as an attachment I think, it destroys the page... have to drag from left to right and visa versa to read... ;)

    Cheers,
    Angel
     

  15. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    Yes... I think you're right! :)
     
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