How/where to support hull off trailer

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by aaronhl, Feb 2, 2015.

  1. aaronhl
    Joined: Aug 2012
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    Location: Central Connecticut

    aaronhl Senior Member

    I bought a Hydrostream Virage and will need to take it off the trailer (or do I?) to replace the floor and possibly core. The top of the boat will also come off so I have full access the the bottom. I know I will use some bottle jacks and wood blocks to get it off the trailer, of course on somewhat level pavement.

    How should I support the hull?
    Where on the hull would be the best area to support it?
    Where do I measure so I know it is level and plum?

    Here are some pictures of the boat:

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  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    You can do the repair on the trailer. It seems to be well supported. Why do you need to get the boat plumb and level?
     
  3. aaronhl
    Joined: Aug 2012
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    Location: Central Connecticut

    aaronhl Senior Member

    So you don't think I need to put support under the pad or under each sponson?

    I just think having a level hull would help with balancing the resin and in addition not "twist" the hull at all?
     
  4. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    If you have to work at the bottom of the boat, you'd better lift and place it on some shims that allow you to work with some comfort from below.
    It is always wise, I do not know what work you will be doing, have a well balanced and fixed hull so that it can not move.
    2 or 3 support in the center and at each chine may be sufficient. Be careful, indeed, that the floor is level and can not move.
     
  5. aaronhl
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    aaronhl Senior Member

    For now I will just be replacing the floor and core, not doing any MAJOR work on the underside of the hull

    My main concern (other than safety) is to support the boat enough so when the core and floor are fiberglassed together that the hull does not warp at all
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The trailer has two outboard runners, keel rollers and bow support. That should be enough. I have done many floors with the boats on their trailer. The keel and bow rollers take most of the load. By core, do you mean the two part expanding foam between the floor and the bottom?
     
  7. aaronhl
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    aaronhl Senior Member

    Right now the boat is only supported by the two bunks and I believe 1 roller. There is some adjustability to get another roller or two supporting the boat.

    By the core I mean the end grain balsa between the fiberglass backing the gelocat and what you see as the bottom if you were to take the walking floor off.

    There is also expanding foam throughout each sponson that I will be removing and putting bulkheads instead.
     
  8. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Although the issue is not that critical, I suggest that you think about what you will do and how you will do. Is very different repair the boat from a client, and try to save man-hours to make more money, than to repair your own boat. You have no time limit and does have the interest to work comfortable to do your best. You decide.
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    TANSL: stick to tinkering with computer programs. You know nothing of boat repair. The photos show a boat that is well supported. It is standard procedure to leave a boat on its trailer when it is well supported and it has nothing to do with making more money. Also, there is no need to level a boat. Otherwise, it would be impossible to work on a boat when it is floating.
    aarronhl: There should be a laminate and not just gelcoat on the bottom. If it is cored and delaminated, the problem is much more serious than just redoing the floor. Are you sure they are not stringers and bulkheads ( vertical reinforcements)? Can you post some photos of what you describe?
     
  10. aaronhl
    Joined: Aug 2012
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    aaronhl Senior Member

    I have read multiple threads on Screamandfly about cores on the Hydrostreams. Most are wet and delaminated. I haven't inspected mine because I picked the boat up early winter and was only able to take the "replaced" floor out of the boat. The previous owner cut out the soggy floor and just laid plywood on top of it. So here is a picture of my boat with part of the floor cut out. I need to cut the thin fiberglass layer in the ski locker to get at the core.

    [​IMG]

    The reason I ask about proper ways to support the hull because it would obviously be easier to do everything while it's on the trailer, but if I have to replace the core it might need the extra support? And building a cradle and taking it off the trailer will be a lot more work.

    Here is a picture of the same model boat another guy redid. He said he just laid the boat on 4 huge cement blocks when it was redone.

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    [​IMG]

    Thanks for you input so far. Just trying to do my homework so I can hit the ground running when Winters ends.
     
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Yes, if you are taking the core off, more support would be advisable. However, you can make wooden/plywood supports and add them to the trailer. It is already in place with supports on the right place. This website has a lot of info: http://www.hydrostream.org/home.htm
     
  12. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    aaronhl, as I said before, you know what to do, what quality do you do and therefore it is you who decides whether to make things right or make quick and evil. I personally have not experience in repairing boats but I have common sense, which is one of the less common among senses.
    Is not it more logical, and safe, put wooden stands (or any other material) directly on the ground?
     

  13. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The boat does seem well supported though the rule is blocking down the centerline and stands, blocks or wedges under the bilge turn or chine to keep it from flobbing over.

    Once the deck cap is removed the sides of the boat will move and become quite flexible, so insure they stay pretty much where they're suppose to be, so bulkheads, partitions, etc. can fit into the space properly. It's handy to jack and wedge the hull so the old sole is dead bank level. This way you can use a laser level around the inside of the hull shell to get dimensions and bond on perimeter cleats for the new plywood.
     
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