How to make BS Granite ?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Fanie, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Hi guys,

    I want to know how one makes BS Granite. One of my friends have BS Granite table tops in his houseboat and it looks end feels good !

    I know it is made from fiberglass, lightweight.... but how ?
     
  2. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    I believe it's also called modular granite.
     
  3. Flying Flivver
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    Flying Flivver Junior Member

    It is an epoxy aggregate mix made in a hot press or trowled onto a surface, try looking up hand laying resin flooring.

    this video was wade by the hover trowel company but it has some usable info
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etmFLx0rUpE&feature=related

    Another place to look is a company called Granite Transformations
     
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  4. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Hi Fanie

    I fooled around with this a couple years ago with geopolymer resin binder that contain ingredients I can't spell or pronounce....but is quite expensive. You'd need crushed quartz,feldspar.etc as fillers and it ends up being more expensive than actual stone...but that's too heavy.

    The proper term to google is -cultured granite
     
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  5. Herman
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    Herman Senior Member

    There are 2 approaches:

    -1. use sprayable granite, polyester based. Needs equipment, though.

    -2. for the most authentic look, and what they call "composite worktop" over here, use epoxy resin (a durable type) with indeed all kind of aggregates in it. Even pieces of glass or mirrors are used. The mix determines the effect. doable without many tools, but there is a learning curve. I made some parts with that, and the firsts were rubbish. The next ones were ok, though.
     
  6. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    Fanie,

    I can barely remember the formula but I think it is 30% or 40% resin (low shrinkage) by weight to the granite dust. You can buy granite dust or granules in different sieve sizes depending on the effect you want. All you need is a flat, high gloss table (glass works well) with a dam around the sides to hold the mixture. The mixture is around the consistensy of a peanut butter and the dam can be from 1/2" to 1" thick. Mix slowly by adding the dust so as not introduce bubbles and use a spatula, not a stick to mix it. Pour slowly and even out the mixture. You need a vibrator underneath the table to force the bubble up, 10 to 15 mins. until you are satisfied no more air bubbles are present. Cure for at least 24 hours and always lay it flat after demolding otherwise it will sag. It takes about a week to stabilize. It can be cut with a diamond saw or trimmed with a carbide router.

    Granite surface are preferred to be non shiny but if you want high sheen, you can buff it and wax it.

    This technology has been around for sometime. Search for "solid surface" in the net. With the basic technique, you can also make marble, tiffany, or other solid surface look. Aluminum Trihydrite (ATH) is the common and easily available material. It was Dupont that made this "solid surface" popular.

    I used to cast these "stones" in one of my job.
     
  7. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Hi Guys,

    I think the table tops I saw is all composite material.

    I have a suspicion the 'granuals' is gellcoat of varying colours and dabbed with a spunge to give it a branular look - or something similar.
     
  8. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    If it is all composite material, then gel coat of varying hues are deposited to the mold by using an old short brush and brushing through a wire mesh to get the droplets effect. Then a tinted gel coat is sprayed on top and finally the base color which can be as deep a color you want. As it becomes tacky dry, a layer of reinforcing mat is applied then plastic honeycomb or foam core for large unsupported surfaces. Requires skill to do it and you won't get the realistic looking granite.

    If you want realistic granite, get the granite dust/granules, mix it with the resin and spray it on. You need special equipment for this but the beauty of this method is that you can make compound surfaces and the product will look like it was carved out of solid granite. Again, you have to reinforce the back side as the coating is very thin. You may have to do some sanding and buffing to expose the surface of the granules.
     
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  9. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    I have mixed something similar as a floor covering, epoxy resin, pigment and med to coarse sand. It is very costly because of the resin costs, better if you mix it yourself rather than buy the "kit". But for counter tops I would think Formica is better, light, cheap and durable, and easy to replace when it gets beat up.

    There is a fake rock called Corian, made of plastic resin with some kind of mineral dust. Costs less than the more exotic synthetic counter tops, but more than Formica.
     
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  10. Flying Flivver
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    Flying Flivver Junior Member

    you can get corian as thin as 1/4 inch so it fairly light but you have to buy the proper 2 part glue and applicator and clean the joints with at least 95% ethanol befor glueing and use every clamp you've got!

    Formica and corian are just brand names it is called solid surface material.

    I have made alot of counter tops out of it.
     
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